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Caprids Reference Libraries

Page 2 of about 18 Articles
Bharal Himalayan Blue Sheep
2007-08-14 12:54:40

The Bharal (Pseudois nayaur), or Himalayan Blue Sheep is a caprid found in the high Himalayas of Nepal, Tibet, China, Pakistan, and India. The Dwarf Blue Sheep is sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the Bharal. The Bharal is a major food source of the Snow Leopard. The bharal has horns that grow upwards, curve out and then towards the back, somewhat like an upside down mustache. In...

Nilgiri Tahr
2007-08-13 03:07:35

The Nilgiri Tahr (Nilgiritragus hylocrius), is an ungulate native to the Nilgiri Hills and the southwestern portion of the Western Ghats range in India. It is known locally as the Nilgiri Ibex or simply Ibex. The Nilgiri Tahr is more closely related to sheep than it is to other Tahrs. Its habitat is open mountain grassland within the mountain rain forests eco-region above 6500 feet generally....

Himalayan Tahr
2007-08-13 03:04:57

The Himalayan Tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus), is a large ungulate and a close relative to the wild goat. Its native habitat is in the rugged wooded hills and mountain slopes of the Himalaya from northern India to Tibet. They spend the summers grazing in high pastures, then come down the mountains and form mixed-sex herds in the winter. Feral Himalayan Tahrs are an introduced species in the South...

Taiwan Serow
2007-07-17 11:37:21

The Taiwan Serow (Capricornis swinhoei), is a small bovid that lives on Taiwan Island. They are found in mountainous areas at elevations from 650 feet to as high as 3280 feet or even higher. It is the only native bovid of Taiwan. They are usually active at dawn and twilight. They feed on a variety of wild plants. They are solitary and very territorial. They are very agile on rock surface....

Japanese Serow
2007-07-17 11:35:34

The Japanese Serow (Capricornis crispus or Nemorhaedus crispus), is a goat-like antelope found in Honshû, Japan. Japanese serow are found in dense hillside forests where they eat leaves, and acorns. They are diurnal, feeding in the mornings and evenings and resting under rock ledges for the remainder of the day. Japanese serow stand 24 to 36 inches at the shoulder and weigh anywhere from...

Chinese Goral
2007-07-17 11:33:40

The Chinese Goral (Nemorhaedus caudatus), is a species of wild goat found in the mountains of eastern and northern Asia. A population of this subspecies exists in the Korean Demilitarized Zone, near the tracks of the Donghae Bukbu Line. The species is classified as endangered in South Korea, with an estimated population of less than 250.

Chamois
2007-07-17 11:32:50

The Chamois (Rupicapra Rupicapra), is a goat-like animal native to the European Alps, the Corno Grande region of the central Italian Apennines, the Tatra Mountains, Balkans, parts of Turkey, and to the Caucasus. The species has also become established on the south island of New Zealand. Chamois live at moderately high altitudes and are adapted to living in steep, rugged, rocky terrain. Their...

Musk Ox
2005-06-02 11:56:43

The Musk Ox (Ovibos moschatus) is an arctic mammal of the Bovidae family, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor of the male. It belongs to the Caprinae subfamily and is more closely related to goats than to oxen. Both sexes have long curved horns. Musk oxen are usually around 2 m long and 1 m high at the shoulder. The coat includes long guard hairs that reach almost to the ground....

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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