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Latest Capuchin monkey Stories

2005-06-20 18:05:00

New Haven, Conn. - The basic economic theory that people work harder to avoid losing money than they do to make money is shared by monkeys, suggesting this trait has a long evolutionary history, according to a Yale University study under review by the Journal of Political Economy. This phenomenon, known as "loss aversion," refers to the tendency for people to strongly prefer avoiding losses to acquiring gains. "A large body of studies suggest that losses are more than twice as...

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2004-12-10 08:10:00

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Wild South American monkeys routinely use fist-sized rocks to crack open seeds and to dig in dry Brazilian soil for grubs and edible tubers, researchers report in the journal Science. The use of primitive tools by apes and even some birds is not unusual, but Antonio C. de A. Moura of Darwin College and Phyllis C. Lee of the University of Cambridge, both in Cambridge, England, say in Science that they have now observed capuchin monkeys using rocks to gather food during the...


Latest Capuchin monkey Reference Libraries

White-headed Capuchin, Cebus capucinus
2012-07-13 14:39:09

The white-headed Capuchin (Cebus capucinus) is a New World monkey that is native to Central America, as well as the far northwestern area of South America. It is also known as the white-faced capuchin and the white-throated capuchin. Its Central American range includes Honduras, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Reports have shown that it may occur in southern Belize and eastern Guatemala, but these reports have not been confirmed. Its South American range is limited to the northwestern area...

White-fronted Capuchin, Cebus albifrons
2012-07-05 09:37:06

The white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons) is New World monkey that can be found in seven South American countries. Its range includes Peru, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Bolivia, Venezuela, Columbia, and Brazil. This monkey can live in many different forest habitats, depending on its location. It can live in flooded forests, arid forests, and in forests growing over white sand. It also thrives in areas with "high caatinga" growth. The white-fronted capuchin has a large range covering...

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2006-12-28 15:39:01

The Malbrouck (Chlorocebus cynosuros) is an East African arboreal primate belonging to the genus of green monkeys (Chlorocebus). It is one of the most common primates of Africa. Physical characteristics The Malbrouck is a slim, agile primate with long limbs and a long tail. The fur is grayish brown to gray. The breast and belly are white, as well as the cheeks and eyebrows. It has a bald black head. The eyes are brown. The genitals are brightly colored. The scrotum of the male is...

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2006-12-28 13:27:07

The tufted capuchin (Cebus apella), also known as brown capuchin or black-capped capuchin is a New World primate from South America. Tufted capuchins are omnivorous animals, mostly feeding on fruits and invertebrates. They sometimes feed on small vertebrates (e.g. lizards and bird chicks) and other plant parts. It can be found in many different kinds of environments. These environments include moist tropical and subtropical forest, dry forest and disturbed or secondary forest. Like...

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2006-12-28 13:22:56

The white-headed capuchin (Cebus capucinus) is also known as the white-faced Capuchin or white-throated capuchin. It is a small New World monkey. It is of the family Cebidae. Native to the forests of South and Central America, white-throated capuchins are important to rainforest ecology by their role in dispersing seeds and pollen. They are among the best known monkeys. White-headed capuchins are recognized as the typical companion to the organ grinder and for the role of "Marcel" in...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.