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Latest Carbon-14 Stories

2013-03-05 10:35:15

Human activities are not the primary cause of arsenic found in groundwater in Bangladesh. Instead, a team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Barnard College, Columbia University, University of Dhaka, Desert Research Institute and University of Tennessee found that the arsenic in groundwater in the region is part of a natural process that predates any recent human activity, such as intensive pumping. The results appear in the March 4 edition of the Proceedings...

2013-02-12 14:47:33

New research in The FASEB Journal, based on carbon-14 dating, shows that despite repeated high-impact loading, the Achilles tendon is not renewed, but stays the same throughout adult life Notorious among athletes and trainers as career killers, Achilles tendon injuries are among the most devastating. Now, by carbon testing tissues exposed to nuclear fallout in post WWII tests, scientists have learned why: Like our teeth and the lenses in our eyes, the Achilles tendon is a tissue that does...

Radio Carbon Dating Improved With Sediment Measurementss
2012-10-19 13:02:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A research team from Oxford University's Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit has found a more accurate benchmark for dating materials, especially for older objects, from a series of radiocarbon measurements from Japan's Lake Suigetsu. As far back as 1993, researchers realized sediment cores from Lake Suigetsu would be useful for radiocarbon dating. However, the initial efforts encountered technical problems. The current team extracted...

Cold Cases Heat Up To Identify Remains Through Lawrence Livermore Approach
2012-10-10 16:01:46

In an effort to identify the thousands of John/Jane Doe cold cases in the United States, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher and a team of international collaborators have found a multidisciplinary approach to identifying the remains of missing persons. Using "bomb pulse" radiocarbon analysis developed at Lawrence Livermore, combined with recently developed anthropological analysis and forensic DNA techniques, the researchers were able to identify the remains of a missing...

'Faster-Ticking Clock' Indicates Early Solar System May Have Evolved Faster Than We Think
2012-05-02 07:00:54

Our solar system is four and a half billion years old, but its formation may have occurred over a shorter period of time than we previously thought, says an international team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and universities and laboratories in the US and Japan. Establishing chronologies of past events or determining ages of objects require having clocks that tick at different paces, according to how far back one looks. Nuclear clocks, used for dating, are based on...

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2011-02-11 11:05:00

While enthusiasts across the world pored over the Voynich manuscript, penned by an unknown author in a language no one understands, a research team at the University of Arizona solved one of its biggest mysteries: When was the book made? University of Arizona researchers have cracked one of the puzzles surrounding what has been called "the world's most mysterious manuscript" "“ the Voynich manuscript, a book filled with drawings and writings nobody has been able to make sense of to this...

2011-01-07 07:10:00

AKRON, Ohio, Jan. 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A number of new ventures, funded with millions of dollars by large oil companies and major investors, are growing algae to produce biodiesel, jet fuel and other biofuels. Many of these processes use fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) to "feed" their photosynthetic algae, which as a side effect could help reduce global warming. But a potentially greater advantage from using fossil fuel CO2 to grow algae is that it can create a wide variety of safer,...

2011-01-04 07:15:00

AKRON, Ohio, Jan. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A new method of child and maternal nutrition could prevent a specific type of genetic damage that would otherwise occur in up to 160 million brain cells in each person over their lifetime. Preventing this genetic damage could have significant implications related to aging and cancer. Most people are unaware that every type of food currently eaten is measurably contaminated with a radioactive material from the air known as carbon-14, or radiocarbon....

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2010-09-16 07:55:26

Recent puzzling observations of tiny variations in nuclear decay rates have led some to question the science of using decay rates to determine the relative ages of rocks and organic materials. Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), working with researchers from Purdue University, the University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Wabash College, tested the hypothesis that solar radiation might affect the rate at which radioactive elements decay...

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2010-08-26 23:46:03

Radiocarbon dating is used to determine the age of everything from ancient artifacts to prehistoric corals on the ocean bottom. But in a recent study appearing in the Aug. 26 edition of the journal, Nature, a Lawrence Livermore scientist and his colleagues used the method to trace the pathway of carbon dioxide released from the deep ocean to the atmosphere at the end of the last ice age.The team noticed that a rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations coincided with a reduced amount of...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.