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Latest Carbon capture and storage Stories

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2012-06-12 16:48:43

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Cutting edge carbon capture technology is having quite the year so far as UK scientists said they have developed a "metal-organic framework" that works like a sponge, absorbing carbon dioxide from high pressure emissions. This latest breakthrough in clean energy technology, called NOTT-202, absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere by soaking in pressurized gasses and releasing these gases under lowered pressure while retaining the greenhouse gas, according to a...

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2012-06-01 11:01:28

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com New evidence points to troubling levels of carbon dioxide, the world´s primary greenhouse gas, in the Earth´s atmosphere. Several arctic monitoring stations are measuring more than 400 parts per million (ppm) of the heat-trapping gas in the atmosphere this spring, compared with the 350 ppm that many scientists say is the highest safe level for carbon dioxide. While some carbon dioxide production is natural, from decomposing dead plants and...

'Swiss Cheese' Molecules Catch Carbon
2012-05-31 04:34:44

DM Crumbliss for RedOrbit.com A study has identified new minerals that could cut the costs of removing carbon dioxide from emissions at power plants. The research was done by scientists at Rice University, the University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was published online this week in the journal Nature Materials. Fossil fuel power plants are responsible for about half the CO2 emissions added to the...

Prime Materials For Efficient Carbon Capture Pinpointed Using Computer Model
2012-05-28 09:34:26

Model vets millions of structures to find ones that will improve efficiency of current technology When power plants begin capturing their carbon emissions to reduce greenhouse gases — and to most in the electric power industry, it's a question of when, not if — it will be an expensive undertaking. Current technologies would use about one-third of the energy generated by the plants — what's called "parasitic energy" — and, as a result, substantially drive up the...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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