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Latest Carbon cycle Stories

Extreme Weather Adds To Warming
2013-08-15 05:05:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, violent storms, heat waves and lengthy droughts cause terrestrial ecosystems to absorb approximately 11 billion tons less carbon dioxide each year, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. That is equivalent to approximately one-third of global CO2 emissions each year, according to an international team of researchers led by...

2013-08-08 09:18:00

Forests have a limited capacity to soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a new study from Northern Arizona University. The study, available online in the journal New Phytologist, aimed to explore how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide could alter the carbon and nitrogen content of ecosystems. By performing tests on subtropical woodland plots over an 11-year period, the researchers found that ecosystem carbon uptake was not significantly increased by the high CO2...

Australian Soil Carbon Loss From Dust Storms And Erosion
2013-08-07 05:31:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) of Australia shows that although topsoil is rich in nutrients and carbon, it is increasingly being blown away by events such as the "Red Dawn" in Sydney in 2009. The amount and location of soil carbon is changed when wind lifts carbon dust into the atmosphere. Some of the carbon falls back to the ground, some leaves Australia and some ends up in...

2013-08-06 12:21:53

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., Aug. 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Forests have a limited capacity to soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), according to a new study from Northern Arizona University. The study, available online in the journal New Phytologist, aimed to explore how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide could alter the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content of ecosystems. By performing tests on subtropical woodland plots over an 11-year period, the researchers found that ecosystem carbon...

2013-07-24 16:20:30

WASHINGTON, July 24, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA scientists and an international team of researchers have found tropical ecosystems can generate significant carbon dioxide when temperatures rise, unlike ecosystems in other parts of the world. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The researchers discovered a temperature increase of just 1 degree Celsius in near-surface air temperatures in the tropics leads to an average annual growth rate of...

Variations In Earth’s Carbon Dioxide Levels Regulated By Tropical Ecosystems
2013-07-23 13:25:45

CSIRO Rising temperatures, influenced by natural events such as El Nino, have a corresponding increase in the release of carbon dioxide from tropical forest ecosystems, according to a new study out today. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that a temperature anomaly of just 1 degree C (in near surface air temperatures in the tropics) leads to a 3.5-Petagram (billion tonnes of carbon) anomaly in the annual CO2 growth rate, on...

New Variability In Iron Supply To The Oceans With Climate Implications Discovered By Scientists
2013-07-19 09:44:51

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK) The supply of dissolved iron to oceans around continental shelves has been found to be more variable by region than previously believed -- with implications for future climate prediction. Iron is key to the removal of carbon dioxide from the Earth's atmosphere as it promotes the growth of microscopic marine plants (phytoplankton), which mop up the greenhouse gas and lock it away in the ocean. A new study, led by researchers based at the...

Trees Use Water More Efficiently Due To CO2 Rise
2013-07-11 08:01:38

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Trees are becoming more efficient at using water in response to higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, according to new research published Wednesday in the journal Nature. In the study, researchers including Dave Hollinger from the US Forest Service's Northern Research Station (NRS) and Trevor Keenan of Harvard University analyzed direct, long-term measurements of whole-ecosystem carbon and water exchange. According to...

2013-07-10 19:48:13

Researchers find that a changing atmosphere affects how much water trees require Spurred by increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, forests over the last two decades have become dramatically more efficient in how they use water, a Harvard study has found. Studies have long predicted that plants would begin to use water more efficiently as atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rose. A research team led by Research Associate Trevor Keenan and Assistant Professor of Organismic and...

Northern Biomass Of Earth Has Been Mapped And Measured
2013-06-26 07:53:13

ESA The biomass of the northern hemisphere’s forests has been mapped with greater precision than ever before thanks to satellites, improving our understanding of the carbon cycle and our prediction of Earth’s future climate. Accurately measuring forest biomass and how it varies are key elements for taking stock of forests and vegetation. Since forests assist in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, mapping forest biomass is also important for understanding the global carbon...