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Latest Carbon cycle Stories

Carbon Dioxide Observatory Spacecraft Placed In Vacuum Chamber In Preps For Launch
2013-12-26 03:31:31

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) was recently placed into a thermal vacuum chamber to prepare for its launch in July 2014. The OCO-2 is a craft that will orbit the Earth and take high-resolution data of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. It was prepped and tested at the Orbital Sciences Satellite Manufacturing Facility in Gilbert, Arizona. In late November the OCO-2 was placed into the vacuum chamber to confirm the...

Rivers, Streams Release Far More Carbon Dioxide Than Do Lakes: Study
2013-12-10 06:51:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Contrary to common belief, rivers and streams release carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere at a rate five times greater than the world's lakes and reservoirs combined. The findings of this international study, which included the University of Waterloo, have been published in the journal Nature. "Identifying the sources and amounts of carbon dioxide released from continental water sources has been a gap in understanding the carbon...

Sea-Level Rise Will Continue To Fuel Destructive Coastal Flooding
2013-12-05 10:26:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Two new literature review studies, published in Nature, reveal changing coastal ocean functions. The first study, "Coastal flooding by tropical cyclones and sea-level rise," reveals that the clamor about whether climate change will cause increasingly destructive tropical storms may be overshadowing a more unrelenting threat to coastal property: sea-level rise. Jonathan D. Woodruff, an assistant professor of sedimentology and...

Forest Ecosystems Keep The Earth From Cooking
2013-10-17 04:10:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study led by Princeton University, enhanced growth of the Earth's plants during the 20th century has caused a significant slowdown of the Earth's transition to being "red-hot." This study, the first to specify the extent to which plants have prevented climate change since pre-industrial times, found that land ecosystems have kept the planet cooler by absorbing billions of tons of carbon, especially during the past 60...

Dark Ocean Carbon Absorption Not Enough To Restrict Global Warming
2013-09-06 07:46:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Iowa shows that although microbes that live below 600 feet where light doesn’t penetrate – the so called “dark ocean”-- might not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon, meriting further study. The findings of this study were published in the International Society of Microbial Ecology Journal. While many people are familiar with the...

Carbon-sequestering Ocean Plants May Handle Climate Changes Over The Long Run
2013-08-26 14:33:35

San Francisco State University A year-long experiment on tiny ocean organisms called coccolithophores suggests that the single-celled algae may still be able to grow their calcified shells even as oceans grow warmer and more acidic in Earth's near future. The study stands in contrast to earlier studies suggesting that coccolithophores would fail to build strong shells in acidic waters. The world's oceans are expected to become more acidic as human activities pump increasing amounts of...

Research Could Help Scientists Predict How Carbon Is Stored Underground
2013-08-23 05:49:36

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computer simulations conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could help scientists make sense of a recently observed and puzzling wrinkle in one of nature’s most important chemical processes. It turns out that calcium carbonate—the ubiquitous compound that is a major component of seashells, limestone, concrete, antacids and myriad other naturally and industrially produced substances—may...

Extreme Weather Adds To Warming
2013-08-15 05:05:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, violent storms, heat waves and lengthy droughts cause terrestrial ecosystems to absorb approximately 11 billion tons less carbon dioxide each year, according to new research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. That is equivalent to approximately one-third of global CO2 emissions each year, according to an international team of researchers led by...

2013-08-08 09:18:00

Forests have a limited capacity to soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a new study from Northern Arizona University. The study, available online in the journal New Phytologist, aimed to explore how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide could alter the carbon and nitrogen content of ecosystems. By performing tests on subtropical woodland plots over an 11-year period, the researchers found that ecosystem carbon uptake was not significantly increased by the high CO2...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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