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Latest Carbon cycle Stories

Warming Oceans Will Play Major Role In Less Phytoplankton Diversity
2012-10-26 07:33:14

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Phytoplankton (plant wanderers), organisms that exist in the sunlit layer of the world´s oceans, are important for the sustainability of the aquatic food web. However, future warming oceans could significantly alter the populations of these important organisms, further impacting climate change. Since phytoplankton play a major role in the food chain and the world´s carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous cycles, a significant...

Alpine Glaciers Important For Carbon Cycle 091812
2012-09-18 12:19:01

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online On the surface, the term “carbon cycle” can seem cold and almost prosaic. It´s a term that many of us learned and came to understand in a third-grade science class, with the help of rudimentary illustrations of the sun shining down on the grass that the cow was about to devour for lunch and oversized arrows tracing the flow of energy for us. Like many things we learned in those early classes, it was diluted down to...

2012-08-31 12:09:43

In a surprising finding, North Carolina State University researchers have shown that certain underground organisms thought to promote chemical interactions that make the soil a carbon sink actually play a more complex, dual role when atmospheric carbon levels rise. In a paper published in the Aug. 31 edition of Science, North Carolina State University researchers show that important and common soil microscopic organisms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), play a role in sequestering...

Biomass Increase Found In West African Forests
2012-08-27 07:09:25

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Even in the midst of a four decade long drought, protected forests in West Africa have somehow experienced an increase in their carbon storage capacity in recent years, a team of researchers from Ghana and the UK have discovered. According to BBC News Environmental Reporter Mark Kinver, previous studies had suggested that a lack of precipitation in Ghana and the surrounding region resulted "in less carbon being stored as...

Two New Views Of Carbon Sinks
2012-08-02 05:35:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the last 50 years, man has quadrupled his CO2 output, primarily through the burning of fossil fuels. That is a startling and sobering concept. So far, though, Mother Nature seems to be keeping pace. In a new study released August 2, 2012, in the journal Nature, researchers from NOAA and the University of Colorado assert that Earth's carbon sinks continue to soak up roughly half of the carbon output. Carbon sinks are areas of...

As Area Burned By Wildfire Increases Washington's Forests Will Lose Stored Carbon
2012-07-26 10:33:45

Even small increases in area burned could have significant impacts on carbon storage Forests in the Pacific Northwest store more carbon than any other region in the United States, but our warming climate may undermine their storage potential. A new study conducted by the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station and the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington has found that, by 2040, parts of Washington State could lose as much as a third of their carbon...

Rising Carbon Dioxide In Atmosphere Speeds Carbon Loss From Forest Soils
2012-07-10 15:29:04

Underappreciated player in carbon storage should be included in global change models, researcher says Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide accelerate carbon cycling and soil carbon loss in forests, new research led by an Indiana University biologist has found. The new evidence supports an emerging view that although forests remove a substantial amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, much of the carbon is being stored in living woody biomass rather than as dead organic...

Researchers Measure Carbon In The Arctic Ocean
2012-05-22 03:59:49

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have conducted a new study to measure levels of carbon at various depths in the Arctic Ocean. The study, recently published in the journal Biogeosciences, provides data that will help researchers better understand the Arctic Ocean´s carbon cycle–the pathway through which carbon enters and is used by the marine ecosystem. It will also offer an important point of reference for determining how those levels of carbon...

Image 1 - Carbon-Counting Instrument Travels To Arizona
2012-05-12 04:21:07

Its construction now complete, the science instrument that is the heart of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) spacecraft - NASA's first mission dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide - has left its nest at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and has arrived at its integration and test site in Gilbert, Ariz. A truck carrying the OCO-2 instrument left JPL before dawn on Tuesday, May 9, to begin the trek to Orbital Science Corporation's Satellite...

2012-03-28 00:33:13

Life deep in the seabed proceeds very slowly. But the slow-growing bacteria living many meters beneath the seafloor play an important role in the global storage of organic carbon and have a long-term effect on climate. A team of scientists from Aarhus University (Denmark) and the University of Rhode Island have developed a new method for measuring this slow life deep down in the seabed. According to URI Oceanography Professor Arthur Spivack, the relative abundance of amino acids that are...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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