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Latest Carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere Stories

Antarctic Was Tropical During The Eocene Epoch
2012-08-02 10:22:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the world´s greatest athletes compete for gold, silver, and bronze in London, new scientific evidence suggests that future summer Olympics could be hosted in a more remote location: Antarctica. An international team of climate scientists has discovered 50 million-year-old fossilized pollen in the seabed off the eastern coast of the polar continent, according to their report published this week in the journal Nature. The...

Two New Views Of Carbon Sinks
2012-08-02 05:35:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the last 50 years, man has quadrupled his CO2 output, primarily through the burning of fossil fuels. That is a startling and sobering concept. So far, though, Mother Nature seems to be keeping pace. In a new study released August 2, 2012, in the journal Nature, researchers from NOAA and the University of Colorado assert that Earth's carbon sinks continue to soak up roughly half of the carbon output. Carbon sinks are areas of...

Tropical Climate In The Antarctic
2012-08-01 14:14:47

Palm trees once thrived on today's icy coasts 52 million years ago Given the predicted rise in global temperatures in the coming decades, climate scientists are particularly interested in warm periods that occurred in the geological past. Knowledge of past episodes of global warmth can be used to better understand the relationship between climate change, variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide and the reaction of Earth's biosphere. An international team led by scientists from the Goethe...

Ice Cores Analysis Shows Warming And CO2 Are Closely Related
2012-07-25 08:28:23

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have always linked the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a rise in global temperatures, but new research by an international team of scientists connects the cause and effect more strongly than ever before. According to their report recently published in the scientific journal Climate of the Past, the research team tested tiny bubbles of air trapped in layers of ice around Antarctica for carbon dioxide levels and...

2012-07-05 00:18:30

A climate model accounting for the carbon dioxide (CO2) released into our atmosphere before the industrial revolution has been used to show the detrimental effect of carbon emissions on global temperature in the long-term. In a study published today, 4 July, in IOP Publishing's journal Environmental Research Letters, researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science have shown that pre-industrial emissions from land use changes are responsible for about nine per cent of the increase in...

2012-07-04 23:46:54

When evaluating the historic contributions made by different countries to the greenhouse gasses found in Earth's atmosphere, calculations generally go back no further than the year 1840. New research from Carnegie's Julia Pongratz and Ken Caldeira shows that carbon dioxide contributions from the pre-industrial era still have an impact on our climate today. Their work is published in Environmental Research Letters. The burning of fossil fuels that came with industrialization released...

Ancient Antarctica Was A Completely Different Place
2012-06-18 04:13:26

A new university-led study with NASA participation finds ancient Antarctica was much warmer and wetter than previously suspected. The climate was suitable to support substantial vegetation -- including stunted trees -- along the edges of the frozen continent. The team of scientists involved in the study, published online June 17 in Nature Geoscience, was led by Sarah J. Feakins of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and included researchers from NASA's Jet Propulsion...

2012-06-17 10:20:09

WASHINGTON, June 17, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new university-led study with NASA participation finds ancient Antarctica was much warmer and wetter than previously suspected. The climate was suitable to support substantial vegetation -- including stunted trees -- along the edges of the frozen continent. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO ) The team of scientists involved in the study, published online June 17 in Nature Geoscience, was led by Sarah J....

It's All About The Dirt
2012-06-17 03:00:40

[ Watch the Video ] A new study by researchers at BYU, Duke and the USDA finds that soil plays an important role in controlling the planet´s atmospheric future. The researchers set out to find how intact ecosystems are responding to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The earth´s current atmospheric carbon dioxide is 390 parts per million, up from 260 parts per million at the start of the industrial revolution, and will likely rise to more than 500 parts per...

Caltech Researchers Use Stalagmites To Study Past Climate Change
2012-05-04 05:39:29

There is an old trick for remembering the difference between stalactites and stalagmites in a cave: Stalactites hold tight to the ceiling while stalagmites might one day grow to reach the ceiling. Now, it seems, stalagmites might also fill a hole in our understanding of Earth's climate system and how that system is likely to respond to the rapid increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since preindustrial times. Many existing historical climate records are biased to the high latitudes–...