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Latest Carbon nanotube Stories

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2012-07-11 09:30:32

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers are one step closer to solving the mysteries of graphene, the carbon allotrope that could be the basis for the next generation of sensors, transistors, processors and more - if scientists can find a way to produce it in large quantities and mold it into the shape necessary to power future devices. One of the major problems with the material is that it is difficult to grow it into a layer that is only a single atom...

2012-07-09 17:19:27

Rice University study details exactly how nanotubes bend and break What´s 100 times stronger than steel, weighs one-sixth as much and can be snapped like a twig by a tiny air bubble? The answer is a carbon nanotube – and a new study by Rice University scientists details exactly how the much-studied nanomaterials snap when subjected to ultrasonic vibrations in a liquid. “We find that the old saying ℠I will break but not bend´ does not hold at the micro- and...

New Interest Sparked In The Century-old Edison Battery
2012-06-26 13:00:30

Stanford University scientists have breathed new life into the nickel-iron battery, a rechargeable technology developed by Thomas Edison more than a century ago. Designed in the early 1900s to power electric vehicles, the Edison battery largely went out of favor in the mid-1970s. Today only a handful of companies manufacture nickel-iron batteries, primarily to store surplus electricity from solar panels and wind turbines. "The Edison battery is very durable, but it has a number of...

2012-06-22 12:01:40

A team of researchers from Peking University in Beijing, China, and Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has demonstrated that carbon nanotube-based integrated circuits can work under a supply voltage much lower than that used in conventional silicon integrated circuits. Low supply voltage circuits produce less heat, which is a key limiting factor for increased circuit density. Carbon-based electronics have attracted attention mostly because of their speed. The new research shows that...

2012-06-11 18:31:18

Trinity College Dublin scientists establish link between autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and nanoparticles New groundbreaking research by scientists at Trinity College Dublin has found that exposure to nanoparticles can have a serious impact on health, linking it to rheumatoid arthritis and the development of other serious autoimmune diseases. The findings that have been recently published in the international journal 'Nanomedicine' have health and safety implications for...

'Unzipped' Carbon Nanotubes May Help Energize Fuel Cells And Batteries
2012-05-28 09:40:09

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes riddled with defects and impurities on the outside could replace some of the expensive platinum catalysts used in fuel cells and metal-air batteries, according to scientists at Stanford University. Their findings are published in the May 27 online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology. "Platinum is very expensive and thus impractical for large-scale commercialization," said Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford and co-author of the study....


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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