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Latest Carbon nanotube Stories

2011-10-14 10:05:05

An international team of researchers has invented new artificial muscles strong enough to rotate objects a thousand times their own weight, but with the same flexibility of an elephant´s trunk or octopus limbs. In a paper published online today on Science Express, the scientists and engineers from the University of British Columbia, the University of Wollongong in Australia, the University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in Korea detail their innovation. The study elaborates...

Image 1 - Carbon Nanotube Muscles Generate Giant Twist For Novel Motors
2011-10-14 07:06:07

Twist per muscle length is over a thousand times higher than for previous artificial muscles and the muscle diameter is ten times smaller than a human hair New artificial muscles that twist like the trunk of an elephant, but provide a thousand times higher rotation per length, were announced on Oct. 13 for a publication in Science magazine by a team of researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas, The University of Wollongong in Australia, The University of British Columbia in...

'Mirage-effect' Helps To Hide Objects
2011-10-04 10:37:03

Scientists have created a working cloaking device that not only takes advantage of one of nature's most bizarre phenomenon, but also boasts unique features; it has an 'on and off' switch and is best used underwater. The researchers, from the University of Dallas, Texas, have demonstrated the device's ability to make objects disappear in a fascinating video shown here. This novel design, presented today, Tuesday 4 September, in IOP Publishing's journal Nanotechnology, makes use of sheets...

2011-10-03 19:48:08

Tangled early-stage tube growth yields to orderly alignment of nanoscale structures Boston College researchers have discovered two early-stage phases of carbon nanotube growth during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, finding a disorderly tangle of tube growth that ultimately yields to orderly rows of the nanoscopic tubes, according to a report in the latest edition of the journal Nanotechnology. By using a thin layer of catalyst, Professor of Physics Zhifeng Ren and researcher...

2011-09-27 17:40:27

Researchers from Northwestern University have developed a carbon-based material that could revolutionize the way solar power is harvested. The new solar cell material — a transparent conductor made of carbon nanotubes — provides an alternative to current technology, which is mechanically brittle and reliant on a relatively rare mineral. Due to the earth abundance of carbon, carbon nanotubes have the potential to boost the long-term viability of solar power by providing a...

2011-09-27 11:22:00

Fortuitous discovery in UC Riverside physics lab made using stacked layers of “wonder material” An accidental discovery in a physicist´s laboratory at the University of California, Riverside provides a unique route for tuning the electrical properties of graphene, nature´s thinnest elastic material. This route holds great promise for replacing silicon with graphene in the microchip industry. The researchers found that stacking up three layers of graphene, like...

2011-09-27 10:37:53

Fortuitous discovery in UC Riverside physics lab made using stacked layers of 'wonder material' An accidental discovery in a physicist's laboratory at the University of California, Riverside provides a unique route for tuning the electrical properties of graphene, nature's thinnest elastic material. This route holds great promise for replacing silicon with graphene in the microchip industry. The researchers found that stacking up three layers of graphene, like pancakes, significantly...

Why Carbon Nanotubes Spell Trouble For Cells
2011-09-19 04:10:52

  [ View the Video ] It's been long known that asbestos spells trouble for human cells. Scientists have seen cells stabbed with spiky, long asbestos fibers, and the image is gory: Part of the fiber is protruding from the cell, like a quivering arrow that's found its mark. But scientists had been unable to understand why cells would be interested in asbestos fibers and other materials at the nanoscale that are too long to be fully ingested. Now a group of researchers at Brown...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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