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Latest Carbonic anhydrase Stories

2009-10-15 14:49:51

In 1767, chemist Joseph Priestley stood in his laboratory one day with an idea to help English mariners stay healthy on long ocean voyages. He infused water with carbon dioxide to create an effervescent liquid that mimicked the finest mineral waters consumed at European health spas. Priestley's man-made tonic, which he urged his benefactors to test aboard His Majesty's ships, never prevented a scurvy outbreak. But, as the decades passed, his carbonated water became popular in cities and towns...

2008-08-09 03:00:24

By Lapointe, Mathieu MacKenzie, Tyler D B; Morse, David The oceans globally constitute an important sink for carbon dioxide (CO2) due to phytoplankton photosynthesis. However, the marine environment imposes serious restraints to carbon fixation. First, the equilibrium between CO2 and bicarbonate (HCO^sub 3^-) is pH dependent, and, in normal, slightly alkaline seawater, [CO2] is typically low (approximately 10 mM ). Second, the rate of CO2 diffusion in seawater is slow, so, for any cells...

2008-06-24 03:02:21

By Ferreira, Fernando J Guo, Cathy; Coleman, John R Carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) catalyzes the interconversion of CO^sub 2^ and HCO^sub 3^^sup -^ and is a major protein constituent of the C^sub 3^ higher plant chloroplast where it is presumed to play a role in photosynthetic carbon assimilation. In this study, we have used both RNA antisense and gene knockout lines to specifically reduce the activity of the chloroplast betaCA1 polypeptide (At3g01500) in the model plant Arabidopsis...

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2005-07-19 12:28:10

How have the molecules essential to life, such as proteins, adapted to function in extreme environments? The proteins that may help answer this question have been isolated from halophilic (salt-loving) microorganisms from the Dead Sea. So what's living in the Dead Sea anyway? Astrobiology Magazine -- Over the years, a number of Weizmann Institute scientists have addressed the question of how molecules essential to life, such as proteins, have adapted to function in extreme environments. The...

2005-07-12 00:30:00

Over the years, a number of Weizmann Institute scientists have addressed the question of how molecules essential to life, such as proteins, have adapted to function in extreme environments. The proteins they investigated were isolated from halophilic (salt-loving) microorganisms from the Dead Sea. After determining the 3-D structures for several halophilic proteins, researchers were able to explain how these proteins not only cope with high salinities, but are actually "addicted" to them....

2004-11-25 15:00:08

Moran Eye Center researchers have found gene mutations that result in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), one of the leading causes of blindness. The discovery has raised fears that medications commonly used to treat both heart disease and glaucoma may trigger the eye disease in even those without the mutation because of similarities in what the mutations and the drugs do to the eyes. The research, published in the online version of Human Molecular Genetics Wednesday, says each gene mutation...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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