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Latest cardiac arrhythmia Stories

2012-05-09 19:45:46

Older women who have been diagnosed with an irregular heart beat are at higher risk of stroke than men. A new study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) shows that warfarin, the most common anticoagulant therapy used to prevent stroke in patients with Atrial fibrillation (AF) may not be as effective in women, 75 years or older, as in men. "Our results suggest that elderly women with AF may need to be targeted for more effective stroke prevention...

2012-05-08 09:47:05

Northwestern's Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute is the first in Illinois to perform this innovative procedure Patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib) who cannot take blood thinners now have an alternative to reduce their risk of stroke, which is five times more common in people with the rhythm disorder. The non-surgical procedure works by tying off the left atrial appendage (LAA), the source of most blood clots leading to stroke in patients with A-fib. Northwestern Medicine® heart...

2012-05-06 23:00:51

EP Europace July 19, 2011 reports multicenter study demonstrates a significant reduction of fluoroscopy (x-ray radiation) using 3D mapping to guide AF catheter ablation. Scottsdale, Arizona (PRWEB) May 06, 2012 When Dr. Renzo Cataldo, a cardiac electrophysiologist (EP) with Arizona Arrhythmia Consultants, one of the premier cardiac electrophysiology groups in Arizona met with a new patient, he was positive he could help him with an advanced AF catheter ablation procedure with excellent...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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