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Latest Cardiac muscle Stories

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2009-12-10 11:28:43

EMBL scientists identify key signaling pathway for heart development and healing Almost a century after it was discovered in fruit flies with notches in their wings, the Notch signaling pathway may come to play an important role in the recovery from heart attacks. In a study published today in Circulation Research, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Monterotondo, Italy, are the first to prove that this signaling pathway targets heart muscle cells and thus reveal...

2009-12-09 10:21:47

Bioengineers from University of California, San Diego are developing new regenerative therapies for heart disease that could influence the way in which regenerative therapies for cardiovascular and other diseases are treated in the future. New results from UC San Diego on using adult stem cells to regenerate heart tissue in environments that mimic a human post-heart-attack heart were presented this week in San Diego at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)....

2009-12-08 20:10:36

Silicon-based technology cuts testing time from 6 hours to 45 minutes Scientists at Singapore's Institute of Microelectronics (IME) have developed a rapid and sensitive integrated system to test simultaneously for specific cardiac biomarkers in finger prick amount of blood. The silicon-based integrated system's features could help physicians quickly arrive at the right diagnosis for timely medical intervention in patients suspected of having heart attacks -- particularly individuals who do...

2009-11-25 14:28:25

Unstable structural elements of the heart muscle lead to heart failure / Heidelberg cardiologists publish in Nature Medicine Over the course of a lifetime, the heart pumps some 250 million liters of blood through the body. In the order to do this, the muscle fibers of the heart have to be extremely durable. The research group headed by Dr. Wolfgang Rottbauer, vice chair of the Department of Medicine III at Heidelberg University Hospital (Chairman: Prof. Dr. H. A. Katus), has discovered a...

2009-10-24 10:36:02

Cardiac rhythm disorders can result from disturbances in cardiac metabolism. These metabolic changes are tightly linked with specific cardiac electrophysiology (CEP) abnormalities, such as depressed excitability, impaired intra- and extracellular conductivities, wave propagation block, and alteration of conduction velocity, action potential amplitude, and duration. The altered electrophysiology eventually can lead to arrhythmias, fibrillation, and cardiac death; therefore, understanding the...

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2009-10-16 14:13:45

Scientists have successfully grown heart muscle tissue from the stem cells of mice in a new development that could one day lead to revolutionary treatment of heart damage. After a heart attack, doctors do not have any options for repairing the damaged muscle tissue. But a team of scientists at Harvard Stem Cell Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital were able to use a mouse version of a human cardiac master stem cell to grow a functioning piece of heart muscle tissue. "This is the...

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2009-10-11 13:01:20

By mimicking the way embryonic stem cells develop into heart muscle in a lab, Duke University bioengineers believe they have taken an important first step toward growing a living "heart patch" to repair heart tissue damaged by disease. In a series of experiments using mouse embryonic stem cells, the bioengineers used a novel mold of their own design to fashion a three-dimensional "patch" made up of heart muscle cells, known as cardiomyocytes. The new tissue exhibited the two most important...

2009-10-08 08:41:16

Pre-formed blood vessels in patches connect to rodents' heart circulation University of Washington (UW) researchers have succeeded in engineering human tissue patches free of some problems that have stymied stem-cell repair for damaged hearts. The disk-shaped patches can be fabricated in sizes ranging from less than a millimeter to a half-inch in diameter. Until now, engineering tissue for heart repair has been hampered by cells dying at the transplant core, because nutrients and oxygen...

2009-10-06 15:08:47

Researchers have fresh insight into an evolutionarily ancient way that cells cope when oxygen levels decline, according to a new study in the October 7th issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. In studies of cells taken from the lining of human pulmonary arteries, they show that a microRNA "“ a tiny bit of RNA that regulates the activity of particular genes and thus the availability of certain proteins "“ allows cells to shift their metabolic gears, in a process known...

2009-10-05 09:32:36

New research in the FASEB Journal shows that fast myosin motor gene transfer increases contractions of heart muscle cells Scientists from the Universities of Michigan and Minnesota show in a research report published online in the FASEB Journal that gene therapy may be used to improve an ailing heart's ability to contract properly. In addition to showing gene therapy's potential for reversing the course of heart failure, it also offers a tantalizing glimpse of a day when "closed heart...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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