Quantcast
Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Cardiac muscle Stories

Human Skin Cells Turned Into Healthy Heart Muscle
2012-05-23 09:50:33

Scientists on Wednesday reported that they have for the first time taken skin cells from heart attacks patients and turned them into healthy heart tissue that could hopefully be used to one day repair damaged heart muscle. The healthy, beating heart tissue was grown successfully in the lab from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), and while scientists said they were not safe enough to put back into human patients, they appeared to work well with other cells when implanted into...

2012-05-09 12:03:38

University of Guelph researchers have found the location and effect of abnormal heart proteins that can cause cardiac failure, a discovery that points to potential new ways to treat the most costly health problem in the world. The study appears today in PLoS ONE, a peer-reviewed international journal published by the Public Library of Science. It is available online: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036821 "In order to cure heart disease, you have to understand its fundamental...

Intense Light Prevents, Treats Heart Attacks
2012-04-26 06:58:12

There are lots of ways to treat a heart attack — CPR, aspirin, clot-busters and more. Now CU medical school researchers have found a new candidate: Intense light. "The study suggests that strong light, or even just daylight, might ease the risk of having a heart attack or suffering damage from one," says Tobias Eckle, MD, PhD, an associate professor of anesthesiology, cardiology, and cell and developmental biology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "For patients,...

2012-04-25 21:20:19

Just a handful of cells in the embryo are all that's needed to form the outer layer of pumping heart muscle in an adult zebrafish. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center used zebrafish embryos and careful employment of a new technique that allows for up to 90 color labels on different cells to track individual cells and cell lines as the heart formed. The scientists were surprised by how few cells went into making a critical organ structure and they suspect that other organs may...

2012-04-19 11:32:33

New study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology organized by the World Heart Federation Left-ventricular hyper-trabeculation (LVHT) — a feature of certain cardiomyopathies (chronic disease of the heart muscle) — has been found to be more common in black, male athletes according to a new study presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology. A study of 692 athletes carried out in the UK, found that LVHT was more prevalent in athletes compared with non-athletes...

2012-04-05 05:17:13

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- New research reveals new developments to reprogram scar tissue, that is a result from myocardial infarction (MI), into heart muscle cells.  Scientists believe the new approach is a "game changer" with potential to revolutionise treatment of MI. "Our ultimate hope is that, during the acute period following MI, patients will be able to receive direct injections of factors that transform the existing fibroblast cells in the "scar" into new myocytes.  The...

2012-04-02 15:24:22

Structural changes in heart muscle cells after heart failure can be reversed by allowing the heart to rest, according to research at Imperial College London. Findings from a study in rats published today in the European Journal of Heart Failure show that the condition's effects on heart muscle cells are not permanent, as has generally been thought. The discovery could open the door to new treatment strategies. Heart failure means that the heart muscle is too weak or stiff to pump blood as...

2012-04-02 11:22:23

The latest research developments to reprogram scar tissue resulting from myocardial infarction (MI) into viable heart muscle cells, were presented at the Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2012 meeting, held 30 March to 1 April at the South Kensington Campus of Imperial College in London. In a keynote lecture Dr Deepak Srivastava outlined his approach that has been described as a "game changer" with the potential to revolutionize treatment of MI. For the first time at the FCVB...

2012-03-30 08:17:36

Russians born during the Leningrad Siege in World War II, which was responsible for some of the greatest losses of civilian life in history, are giving scientists new strategies to identify people who experienced intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and starvation during childhood at greatest risk of developing long term heart complications.vThe abstract study´, presented at the Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) meeting, in London, UK, 30 March to 1 April 2012, makes use of a...

2012-02-14 11:00:00

That flutter in your heart may have more to do with the movement of sodium ions than the glance of a certain someone across a crowded room. Using the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, researchers from the University of British Columbia have revealed, for the first time, one of the molecular mechanisms that regulates the beating of heart cells by controlling the movement of sodium in out of the cells — and what calcium has to do with it. The findings, published February 14 in the...