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Latest Cardiac muscle Stories

2012-02-09 07:00:00

PENZBERG, Germany, February 9, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to improve preclinical cardiotoxicity assays, reduce drug testing attrition rates, and ensure drug safety, collaborating scientists at the University Medical Center Utrecht [http://www.umcutrecht.nl/zorg ] in the Netherlands, and Bioscience Department of AstraZeneca [http://www.astrazeneca.com/Home ] R&D, Molndal, Sweden, have tested Roche's xCELLigence Cardio Instrument. Their goal was to determine whether...

2012-01-30 12:41:07

A new family of proteins which regulate the human body´s ℠hypoxic response´ to low levels of oxygen has been discovered by scientists at Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary, University of London and The University of Nottingham. The discovery has been published in the international journal Nature Cell Biology. It marks a significant step towards understanding the complex processes involved in the hypoxic response which, when it malfunctions, can cause and affect the...

2012-01-03 06:13:03

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Damaged heart tissue typically doesn´t repair itself, but scientists may have identified signals that are able to coax the heart into producing replacement cardiac muscle cells. Using a zebrafish model system, researchers have identified a family of molecules that can stimulate stem cells to develop into beating heart muscle cells. "Despite advances in modern medicine, management of myocardial infarction and heart failure remains a major challenge," senior...

2011-12-22 15:30:31

Damaged heart tissue is not known for having much inherent capacity for repair. But now, scientists are closing in on signals that may be able to coax the heart into producing replacement cardiac muscle cells. Using a zebrafish model system, researchers have identified a family of molecules that can stimulate stem cells to develop into beating heart muscle cells. The research, published by Cell Press in the December 21st issue of the journal Chemistry & Biology, may pave the way towards...

2011-11-15 19:40:47

After a heart attack, the portions of the heart damaged by a lack of oxygen become scar tissue. Researchers have long sought ways to avoid this scarring, which can harden the walls of the heart, lessen its ability to pump blood throughout the body and eventually lead to heart failure. But new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further. In a study appearing online November 15,...

2011-11-11 18:36:18

Oncostatin M regulates the reversion of heart muscle cells into precursor cells and is vitally important for the self-healing powers of the heart Cellular reversion processes arise in diseases of the heart muscle, for example myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy, which limit the fatal consequences for the organ. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim and the Schüchtermann Klinik in Bad Rothenfelde have identified a protein...

Pythons’ Huge Hearts Offer Insight For Human Heart Health
2011-10-28 05:34:09

While many people think of snakes as creepy, cold-hearted creatures that swallow their prey whole. But it turns out the reptiles actually have enormous hearts that could offer clues to treating people with cardiac disease, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder reported on Thursday. The surprising new study showed that the vast amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding Burmese pythons promote healthy heart growth. The researchers found the amount of...

2011-09-25 12:00:00

Gold nanowires in engineered patches enhance electrical signaling and contraction BOSTON, Sept. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A team of physicians, engineers and materials scientists at Children's Hospital Boston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have used nanotechnology and tiny gold wires to engineer cardiac patches, with cells all beating in time, that could someday help heart attack patients. As reported online by Nature Nanotechnology on September 25, the addition...

2011-09-22 06:17:38

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Stanford researchers have created the first human heart cells that can be paced with light, providing new insight into the heart's function. To create the light-responsive heart cells, the investigators first inserted DNA encoding a light-sensitive protein -- known as ChR2 -- into human embryonic stem cells. ChR2 controls the flow of electrically-charged ions into the cell. The primary ion for heart cells is sodium, which initiates the electrochemical cascade that...

Blood Test Could Help Diagnose Heart Attacks
2011-09-21 03:48:08

  Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researchers are reporting a possible new blood test to help diagnose heart attacks. In the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, researchers report that a large protein known as cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is released to the blood following a heart attack. "This potentially could become the basis for a new test, used in conjunction with other blood tests, to help diagnose heart attacks," said senior...