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Latest Cardiac muscle Stories

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2010-12-08 08:05:00

A common emergency room blood test has been improved to possibly be able to detect heart disease in patients who were previously believed to be healthy, according to a US study published Tuesday. "This test is among the most powerful predictors of death in the general population we've seen so far," said lead study author James de Lemos, associate professor of internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. "It appears that the higher your troponin T, the more likely...

2010-11-17 22:19:36

Study also shows protein reduced scarring in heart tissue Heart tissue and stem cells spring into action to begin repairing muscle damaged in a heart attack, and researchers at Duke University School of Medicine found that a protein naturally produced in the body may potentially play a role in accelerating heart muscle repair. Giving the right dose of this protein named secreted frizzled related protein 2 (sfrp2) in studies of rats helped to prevent heart failure and reduce collagen layering...

2010-11-17 17:28:36

Study Highlights:     * Ample and viable cardiac stem cells can be isolated from elderly and sick patients with heart disease and diabetes.    * It may be possible to treat heart failure patients with their own stem cells.    * An unrelated study notes that an aging heart can generate new cells at a substantial rate. Cardiac stem cells "” even in elderly and sick patients "” could generate new heart muscle and vessel tissue and be used...

2010-11-17 17:27:02

Researchers at UC have found a potential genetic target for heart disease, which could lead to therapies to prevent the development of the nation's No. 1 killer in its initial stages. These findings will be presented for the first time at the American Heart Association's (AHA) Scientific Sessions in Chicago Nov. 17. The study, led by WenFeng Cai, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow under the direction of Litsa Kranias, PhD, AHA distinguished scientist and Hanna Chair in Cardiology in the department of...

2010-11-16 21:42:58

American Heart Association Meeting report Years of research are the basis for the latest drugs and treatments for cardiovascular disease. This discussion will highlight early and pre-clinical research that may well be the foundation of treatments to come. Join us for an informal Q&A with researchers who are passionate about the details of battling cardiovascular disease. We'll discuss a range of topics, from a possible drug target to regulate HDL cholesterol, to injectable goo that boosts...

2010-11-16 19:17:09

University of Cincinnati researchers have discovered a new protein that could be cardioprotective during heart attack, potentially leading to more targeted treatments for patients at risk. These findings are being presented at the American Heart Association's (AHA) Scientific Sessions in Chicago Nov. 16. Researchers in the department of pharmacology and cell biophysics, led by Wen Zhao, PhD, and Chi Keung Lam, a PhD student, under the direction of Litsa Kranias, PhD, AHA distinguished...

2010-11-04 18:03:25

Calcium regulates many critical processes within the body, including muscle contraction, the heartbeat, and the release of hormones. But too much calcium can be a bad thing. In excess, it can lead to a host of diseases, such as severe muscle weakness, a fatal reaction to anesthesia or sudden cardiac death. Now, using intense X-rays from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have determined the...

2010-11-04 01:48:19

Using the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a team of researchers from the University of British Columbia has shed light on the ryanodine receptor, a structure within muscle cells that has been linked to life-threatening congenital heart conditions. The findings were published online today in the journal Nature. "The ryanodine receptor is a complex molecular machine within muscle cells," says Filip Van Petegem, an assistant professor in...

2010-10-26 21:39:35

Researchers in Newfoundland have cracked the genetic code of a sudden death cardiac killer. As a result, they have developed a unique prevention program in which people with no symptoms, but with a suspect gene and a family history, are being implanted with internal cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) which can restart their hearts if they stop. "Our discovery has led to a targeted genetic screening and individualized therapy that is significantly improving survival rates," Dr. Sean Connors told...

2010-10-26 11:09:46

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The genetic code of sudden cardiac death has been cracked. Now, people are able to be genetically screened for sudden cardiac death based on genes and family history, even if they've had no symptoms. The patients are recommended to receive internal cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) implanted to shock their heart if it stops beating. "Our discovery has led to a targeted genetic screening and individualized therapy that is significantly improving survival rates," Dr. Sean...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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