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Latest Cardiac muscle Stories

2010-06-08 19:06:20

Loyola Scientist Describes Gene Research in Journal Article One in 25 people from India and other south Asian countries carries a mutated gene that causes heart failure. Studying this gene, and the protein it encodes, could lead to new treatments for heart failure, Loyola University Health System researcher Sakthivel Sadayappan, PhD, wrote in a recent review article in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. Sadayappan has studied the gene and protein for 15 years. Investigating the...

2010-05-28 18:13:26

Study highlights:     * Investigators in Japan converted stem cells from human amniotic sacs into working heart muscle cells.    * When injected into rats after a heart attack, the cells formed heart muscle cells and repaired damage to restore function.    *  Because the amniotic sac is discarded as medical waste after delivery, amniotic sac cells might potentially become a plentiful and non-controversial source of human stem cells for cardiac...

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2010-04-19 12:57:39

Researchers have discovered a new disorder linked to heart problems that stems from a genetic defect in the protein glycogenin. In a worst case scenario, disruption of this protein's function can lead to cardiac arrest, which is exactly what happened to the young man whose case triggered the investigation at Sahlgrenska University Hospital at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, that led to a brand new diagnosis. Published today in the revered New England Journal of Medicine, the study...

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2010-03-25 08:37:23

Cellular grown-ups outperform stem cells in cardiac repair Bony fish like the tiny zebrafish have a remarkable ability that mammals can only dream of: if you lop off a chunk of their heart they swim sluggishly for a few days but within a month appear perfectly normal. How they accomplish this "” or, more importantly, why we can't "” is one of the significant questions in regenerative medicine today. In a paper published in the March 25, 2010 issue of Nature, researchers working at...

2010-03-24 16:51:47

DURHAM, N.C. "“ Humans have very limited ability to regenerate heart muscle cells, which is a key reason why heart attacks that kill cells and scar heart tissue are so dangerous. But damaged heart muscles in the amazing, highly regenerative zebrafish have given Duke University Medical Center scientists a few ideas that may lead to new directions in clinical research and better therapy after heart attacks. "Our hearts don't seem so complex that they shouldn't have the capacity to...

2010-02-25 15:08:55

Researchers have been able to see how heart failure affects the surface of an individual heart muscle cell in minute detail, using a new nanoscale scanning technique developed at Imperial College London. The findings may lead to better design of beta-blockers, the drugs that can slow the development of heart failure, and to improvements in current therapeutic approaches to treating heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. Heart failure is a progressive and serious condition in which the...

2010-02-20 08:17:45

Scientists are reporting the first-ever data to show that the enzyme calcineurin is critical in controlling normal development and function of heart cells, and that loss of the protein leads to heart problems and death in genetically modified mice. Published Feb. 26 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry as the paper of the week, and posted online Feb. 19, the research was led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The study...

2010-02-16 08:53:56

UCSF researchers have discovered that a protein called B1N1 is necessary for the heart to contract. The findings, published in the Feb. 16 issue of the open access journal PLoS Biology, shed light not only on what makes a heart beat but also on heart failure, a disease where cardiac cells are no longer able to contract and pump blood through the body. "In all of us, a heart beat occurs about once every second. For each successful heart beat, millions of individual heart muscle cells perform...

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2009-12-16 08:55:00

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers, working with colleagues in Korea, have produced a laboratory chip with nanoscopic grooves and ridges capable of growing cardiac tissue that more closely resembles natural heart muscle. Surprisingly, heart cells cultured in this way used a "nanosense" to collect instructions for growth and function solely from the physical patterns on the nanotextured chip and did not require any special chemical cues to steer the tissue development in distinct ways. The...

2009-12-10 12:20:49

Appearing in the December issue of MCP Though they remain a leading killer, heart attacks can be effectively treated provided they can be rapidly diagnosed following initial onset of symptoms. In a study appearing in this month's Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers have identified cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) as a potential new diagnostic biomarker for heart attacks, one that may be particularly valuable for mild attacks in which traditional diagnostic proteins may...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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