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Latest cardiomyopathy Stories

2011-03-25 08:30:00

ANN ARBOR, Mich., March 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Seemingly every year there are reports of a young, apparently healthy athlete dying on the court or playing field. The sudden death of Wes Leonard, a junior at Fennville High School, who died of cardiac arrest from an enlarged heart on March 3, may have parents and coaches wondering if enough is being done to identify athletes at risk for dying suddenly. "We would like to develop a better screening program to help prevent...

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2011-03-23 12:00:00

University of Michigan heart specialists weigh in on how best to reduce sudden deaths in competitive athletes Seemingly every year there are reports of a young, apparently healthy athlete dying on the court or playing field. The sudden death of Wes Leonard, a junior at Fennville High School, who died of cardiac arrest from an enlarged heart on March 3, may have parents and coaches wondering if enough is being done to identify athletes at risk for dying suddenly. "We would like to develop a...

2011-02-21 20:50:00

Findings demonstrate importance of targeted therapy Congenital heart diseases affect approximately one in 100 patients, making them the most common type of birth defect and the number-one cause of pediatric deaths. Now a new study showing that the mTOR inhibitor drug rapamycin can reverse cardiac muscle damage in a mouse model of the congenital disease LEOPARD syndrome not only identifies the first possible medical treatment for this rare condition, but also demonstrates the importance of...

2011-02-04 12:48:21

It's a gene called DOT1L, and if you don't have enough of the DOT1L enzyme, you could be at risk for some types of heart disease. These findings by UNC researchers appear in the Feb. 1, 2011 issue of the journal Genes and Development. Everyone knows chocolate is critical to a happy Valentine's Day. Now scientists are one step closer to knowing what makes a heart happy the rest of the year. It's a gene called DOT1L, and if you don't have enough of the DOT1L enzyme, you could be at risk for...

2010-11-17 20:47:38

Left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), a cardiomyopathy about which little is fully understood, is associated with heart failure (HF), stroke and ventricular arrhythmias, according to a study to be presented Nov. 17 at the 2010 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions in Chicago. The researchers also will report that advanced imaging technologies reveal that developing these cardiac risks appear to progress over time in patients with LVNC. LVNC is an inherited heart muscle...

2010-10-26 21:39:35

Researchers in Newfoundland have cracked the genetic code of a sudden death cardiac killer. As a result, they have developed a unique prevention program in which people with no symptoms, but with a suspect gene and a family history, are being implanted with internal cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) which can restart their hearts if they stop. "Our discovery has led to a targeted genetic screening and individualized therapy that is significantly improving survival rates," Dr. Sean Connors told...

2010-10-26 11:09:46

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The genetic code of sudden cardiac death has been cracked. Now, people are able to be genetically screened for sudden cardiac death based on genes and family history, even if they've had no symptoms. The patients are recommended to receive internal cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) implanted to shock their heart if it stops beating. "Our discovery has led to a targeted genetic screening and individualized therapy that is significantly improving survival rates," Dr. Sean...

2010-10-22 17:07:12

Research led by Klaus Stark and Christian Hengstenberg of the University of Regensburg identified a common variant of the cardiovascular heat shock protein gene, HSPB7, which was found to increase risk for dilated cardiomyopathy by almost 50%. Their paper appears on October 28 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics. Per year, about 6 in 100,000 individuals develop dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), with a higher prevalence in men. This disease is characterized by an enlarged, weakened heart,...

2010-10-01 14:00:25

Head to head: Can electrocardiographic screening prevent sudden death in athletes? Should athletes have to undergo mandatory electrocardiographic screening (also known as ECG or heart trace) before competing? Doctors debate the issue in this week's BMJ. Antonio Pelliccia and Domenico Corrado argue that screening athletes for "silent" heart problems would save lives. They say the best evidence of the efficacy of ECG screening on mortality in athletes comes from Italy, the only country where it...

2010-09-29 14:17:08

Garlic has "significant" potential for preventing cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease that is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes, scientists have concluded in a new study. Their report, which also explains why people with diabetes are at high risk for diabetic cardiomyopathy, appears in ACS' bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Wei-Wen Kuo and colleagues note that people with diabetes have at least twice the risk of death from heart disease as others, with...


Latest cardiomyopathy Reference Libraries

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2008-05-22 18:26:48

The English Cocker Spaniel is a hunting dog, used to drive game toward the guns. This breed has been around for over 500 years. During the mid 1800s, several types of dogs were classified as Cockers; however the breeds were reclassified later in the late 1800s once breed standards were developed. There are two types of Cocker Spaniel, the American and the English. These were shown together until 1936, when the English Cocker received status as a separate breed. The two somewhat resemble each...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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