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Latest Cardiovascular diseases Stories

2012-06-08 05:20:37

Legendary ultra-marathoner Micah True suddenly died while on his typical 12-mile training run on March 27, 2012. The 58-year-old’s best-selling book, Born to Run, documents that he would run as far as 100 miles in a day.

Risk For Cardiovascular Disease In Teens May Decrease With Meditation Practice
2012-06-07 09:18:30

Regular meditation could decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in teens who are most at risk, according to Georgia Health Sciences University researchers.

2012-06-06 21:39:11

One of the top suspects behind killer vascular diseases is the victim of mistaken identity, according to researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, who used genetic tracing to help hunt down the real culprit.

Air Pollution Increases Risk Of Repeated Cardiac Events
2012-06-06 04:52:37

According to new research, air pollution can impact cardiac events like heart attack and stroke as well as cause repeated episodes of these cardiac events.

2012-06-05 09:44:41

Physicians can reduce the number of heart failure deaths and unnecessary hospital admissions by using a new computer-based algorithm developed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) that calculates each patient's individual risk of death.

2012-06-04 19:43:04

An ambitious effort to coordinate heart attack care among every hospital and emergency service in North Carolina improved patient survival rates and reduced the time from diagnosis to treatment.

2012-06-04 19:38:22

North Carolina's coordinated, regional systems for rapid care improved survival rates of patients suffering from the most severe heart attack.

2012-06-04 19:17:00

Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers recently uncovered a brain signaling pathway responsible for regulating the renal excretion of sodium.


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.