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Latest Caretaker gene Stories

2009-11-12 22:38:24

The seeming invincibility of cancerous tumors may be crumbling, thanks to a promising new gene therapy that eliminates the ability of certain cells to repair themselves. Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that inactivation of a DNA repair gene called Hus1 efficiently kills cells lacking p53 -- a gene mutated in the majority of human cancers. Using a mouse model, senior author Robert Weiss, associate professor of molecular genetics, first...

2009-10-26 15:11:30

A rare form of testicular tumor has provided scientists with new insights into how genetic changes (mutations) arise in our children. The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Danish Cancer Society, could explain why certain diseases are more common in the children of older fathers. Mutations can occur in different cells of the body and at different times during life. Some, such as those which occur in 'germ cells' (those which create sperm or eggs), cause changes which affect the...

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2009-10-16 09:39:00

Research Supports Potential for New Anti-Cancer Agent A study published in the October issue of Nature Genetics demonstrates that loss of the tumor-suppressor protein p53, coupled with elimination of the DNA-maintenance protein ATR, severely disrupts tissue maintenance in mice. As a result, tissues deteriorate rapidly, which is generally fatal in these animals. In addition, the study provides supportive evidence for the use of inhibitors of ATR in cancer therapy. Essentially, says senior...

2009-10-13 15:23:29

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have identified two genes believed to play a role in the development of endometrial cancer. These results may eventually lead to better diagnosis and treatment of this increasingly common form of cancer. Endometrial cancer, also known as uterine or womb cancer, is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive system in the Western World. The number of cases being detected has increased markedly, as has mortality. Around 1 300...

2009-10-12 10:00:00

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have identified two genes believed to play a role in the development of endometrial cancer. These results may eventually lead to better diagnosis and treatment of this increasingly common form of cancer. Endometrial cancer, also known as uterine or womb cancer, is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive system in the Western World. The number of cases being detected has increased markedly, as has mortality. Around 1 300...

2009-10-06 09:58:20

Scientists at the University of York have identified and successfully silenced a gene that appears essential to cancer cell survival. Professor Jo Milner and Dr Shafiq Ahmed, from the YCR P53 Research Unit in the Department of Biology, used a process called RNA interference to target the JNK2 gene in both cancer and healthy cells. The cancer cells died but the healthy cells were unaffected. This discovery suggests that the survival of cancer cells depends upon certain genes which healthy...

2009-06-29 10:25:54

Finnish Academy Professors Lauri Aaltonen and Jussi Taipale have identified and described a mechanism whereby a single-base change in the human genome increases the risk of colorectal cancer.The focus in this study was on a common single-base variant occurring in chromosome 8, which in itself causes only a slightly increased risk of cancer. However, the risk allele is carried by 75% of people of European origin and by almost 100% of African populations.The high frequency of the gene variant...

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2009-06-12 15:15:00

Those stubborn grey hairs that come with age really are signs of stress, albeit of the cellular kind, according to a new Japanese study. Genotoxic stress, which is anything that damages our DNA, sets off a chain reaction in which specialized cells known as melanocyte stem cells (MSCs) become damaged, ultimately resulting in a malfunction of the cells responsible for hair color. Scientists discovered that the type of genotoxic stress that damages DNA depletes the MSCs in hair follicles that...

2009-06-07 12:39:36

Mutations extending lifespan induce expression of germline genes in somatic cells In the sense that organisms existing today are connected through a chain of life "“ through their parents, grandparents and other ancestors "“ almost a billion years back to the first animals of the pre-Cambrian era, an animal's reproductive cells can be considered to be immortal. These germline cells generate their offspring's somatic cells "“ other cells involved in all aspects of growth,...

2009-04-20 13:56:43

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have developed a new method to help researchers identify genes that can help protect the body during the aging process. The team developed a method of analyzing genes in multiple ageing tissue types in both animals and humans. The analysis, which included more than five million gene measurements, highlighted the mechanisms used by the body to protect against cellular changes with age that can result in conditions such as muscle degeneration and...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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