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Latest Caretaker gene Stories

2009-03-31 09:07:58

A team of British, Chinese and U.S. researchers has identified a new cancer gene called UTX, on the X chromosome. The scientists said the gene is found in 10 percent of multiple myeloma cases and in 8 percent of esophageal cancers. The researchers said UTX plays a role in overall regulation of the activity of many genes and it's possible they might find other genes with similar roles involved in different tumor types. The scientists said their finding is the first example of mutations in a...

2009-03-09 13:13:02

Canadian scientists say they've discovered eight similar genes that, when mutated, appear to cause medulloblastoma -- a common childhood brain cancer. This discovery is very promising and may help researchers develop better, more targeted treatments so that more of these children will survive and fewer will suffer debilitating side effects, said Christine Williams, director of research programs for the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute. The study was led by Dr. Michael Taylor, a...

2009-03-09 09:12:44

A new analysis has found that certain variations in genes that repair DNA can affect a person's risk of developing Hodgkin disease. Published in the April 1, 2009 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that differences in these genes should be further investigated to better understand individuals' susceptibility to this type of cancer. Proteins that repair damage to DNA are important for maintaining cells' health, particularly for...

2009-02-25 12:06:12

Starting with the tiny fruit fly, and then moving into mouse and human patients, researchers at VIB connected to the Center for Human Genetics (K.U. Leuven) showed that the same gene suppresses cancer in all three. Reciprocally, switching off the gene leads to cancer. The scientists think there is a good chance that the gene can be switched on again with a drug. They report their findings in the reputed scientific journal PLoS Biology.Specialized cellsAll of us begin our lives as one cell,...

2008-09-17 12:00:35

Scientists at Britain's University of Nottingham say they've isolated three genes involved in the development of a type of childhood brain cancer. The researchers, led by Professor Richard Grundy from the university's Children's Brain Tumor Research Center, said the three genes are associated with specific characteristics of ependymoma -- the third most common form of childhood brain cancer. "Understanding the biological causes of cancer is vitally important as it will help us to develop...

2008-09-06 00:00:04

By The Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists have mapped the cascade of genetic changes that turn normal cells in the brain and pancreas into two of the most lethal cancers. The result points to a new approach for fighting tumors and maybe even catching them sooner.Genes blamed for one person's brain tumor were different from the culprits for the next patient, making the puzzle of cancer genetics even more complicated.But Friday's research also found that clusters of seemingly...

2008-09-05 09:00:04

By LAURAN NEERGAARD By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press WASHINGTON Scientists have mapped the cascade of genetic changes that turn normal cells in the brain and pancreas into two of the most lethal cancers. The result points to a new approach for fighting tumors and maybe even catching them sooner. Genes blamed for one person's brain tumor are different from the culprits for the next patient, making the puzzle of cancer genetics even more complicated. But the recent research...

2008-08-05 12:00:00

U.S. scientists say they have determined every type of cancer contains unique gene mutations that give it Darwin's survival of the fittest advantage. The researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Francisco said they discovered the underlying process in tumor formation is the same as for life itself: evolution. After analyzing 500,000 gene mutations, the researchers determined that although different gene mutations control different cancer pathways, each...

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2008-03-21 14:20:00

Among the approximately 23,000 genes found in human DNA, scientists currently estimate that there may be as few as 50 to 100 that have no counterparts in other species. Expand that comparison to include the primate family known as hominoids, and there may be several hundred unique genes. Despite the distinctive contributions these genes likely make to our species, little is known about the roles they play. Now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have produced...

2006-04-04 11:20:56

(RedOrbit) A third gene involved in prostate cancer has been identified by researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School. The new gene discovered, ETV4, along with two others discovered in a previous study, ETV1 and ERG, are EST genes, a group of genes that encode for transcription factors. Under normal cellular conditions ETV4 plays a role in cell division.  However, when it becomes fused with other genes on different chromosomes, it becomes increasingly active...