Quantcast

Latest CARTHAGE Stories

2014-01-21 23:29:29

Titan LED announced today that it has completed a lighting retrofit for Carthage College, which will save the Kenosha, Wisconsin-based college nearly 500,000 KW and $15,000 in electricity bills per year, while dramatically improving light quality for students, staff and visitors. Simi Valley, CA (PRWEB) January 21, 2014 Titan LED, a leading US-based manufacturer and OEM that serves small, medium and enterprise-level customers across the nation, announced today that it has completed a...

2011-11-15 06:33:09

Bonn archeologists discover a huge ancient Greek commercial area on Sicily The Greeks were not always in such dire financial straits as today. But is it necessary to look as far back as these Bonn archeologists did in order to see a huge, flourishing Greek commercial area? They have just discovered a very large commercial area from the ancient Greek era during excavations on Sicily. Led by Professor Dr. Martin Bentz, Bonn archeologists began unearthing one of Greek antiquity's largest...

2010-06-07 10:03:00

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., June 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Voyages to Antiquity's itinerary titled, "Carthage Is To Be Deleted," provides travelers holding American passports an exceptional opportunity to visit and explore the wonders of Libya, now that the country has entered into a groundbreaking trade and investment agreement lifting all visa restrictions on U.S. citizens. This itinerary provides international passengers the perfect opportunity to experience an unforgettable voyage of discovery...

2010-02-17 11:57:15

Researchers examined 348 burial urns to learn that about a fifth of the children were prenatal at death, indicating that young Carthaginian children were cremated and interred in ceremonial urns regardless of cause of death A study led by University of Pittsburgh researchers could finally lay to rest the millennia-old conjecture that the ancient empire of Carthage regularly sacrificed its youngest citizens. An examination of the remains of Carthaginian children revealed that most infants...

7daff4c9c1d43d9d6e689c826a64fde21
2008-10-30 15:05:00

Studies have shown that as many as one in 17 men who currently live near the Mediterranean may be genetically linked to the ancient Phoenicians. Phoenicians resided in the region now known as Lebanon. Their greatest city, Carthage, was destroyed by the Romans centuries ago. Phoenician civilization was an enterprising maritime trading culture that spread across the Mediterranean between the periods of 1550 BC to 300 BC. The Phoenicians' most notable contributions are the alphabet and a love of...

2008-10-13 15:00:19

According to online press (October 12, 2008), the Carthage Acropolium will host a classical music festival during the period October 14 to 31, 2008. The festival, which some of the most interesting musical groups, will feature 13 performances by musical troupes from 13 countries. Originally published by Info-Prod Strategic Business Information. (c) 2008 Info-Prod Research (Middle East). Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

2008-08-12 03:00:44

Famous and romantic Lebanese singer Majida Al Roumi performed at the Carthage music festival, after a four-year of absence. According to the London daily Elaph, Majida came up on stage wearing a white dress, looking like a white dove singing for peace. She began her performance with the song "Talo Hbabna Talo" (Our Beloved Ones Showed Up). A large number of fans cheered her on and welcomed her once again to Carthage. Majida thanked her fans for coming and thanked Tunisia for inviting...

2005-08-15 11:06:35

By Shasta Darlington ROME (Reuters) - Italian archaeologists believe they are on the verge of finding the ancient ships downed in the battle of the Aegates Islands more than 2,000 years ago thanks to modern technology and a police tip-off. "This project has an enormous historical value, but perhaps more important is the relevance for archaeology," Sebastiano Tusa, Sicily's chief of marine culture, told Reuters on Friday. "What we find will help us understand how wars were waged at...

2005-08-12 08:40:00

ROME -- Italian archaeologists believe they are on the verge of finding the ancient ships downed in the battle of the Aegates Islands more than 2,000 years ago thanks to modern technology and a police tip-off. "This project has an enormous historical value, but perhaps more important is the relevance for archaeology," Sebastiano Tusa, Sicily's chief of marine culture, told Reuters on Friday. "What we find will help us understand how wars were waged at that time and how battleships were...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related