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Latest Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Stories

2014-05-01 23:07:52

Noted Conservationist Dr. Joshua R. Ginsberg will assume the position in September of 2014. Millbrook, NY (PRWEB) May 01, 2014 Dr. Joshua R. Ginsberg has been named the next President of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies; he will assume the position in September of 2014. Located in New York’s Hudson Valley, the Cary Institute is one of the world’s largest, most influential independent ecological research centers. Areas of expertise include freshwater ecosystems, disease ecology,...

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2014-03-25 08:54:06

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Amplifying risk of Lyme disease and other tick-borne ailments People living in northern and central parts of the U.S. are more likely to contract Lyme disease and other tick-borne ailments when white-footed mice are abundant. Mice are effective at transferring disease-causing pathogens to feeding ticks. And, according to an in-press paper in the journal Ecology, these "super hosts" appear indifferent to larval tick infestations. Drawing on 16 years...

Legacy Of Acid Rain Threatens Eastern US Water Supplies
2013-08-27 06:39:58

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Human activities are changing the water chemistry of many streams and rivers in the Eastern U.S., with consequences for water supplies and aquatic life, so reports a new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. In the first survey of its kind, researchers looked at long-term alkalinity trends in 97 streams and rivers from Florida to New Hampshire. Sites ranged from small headwater streams to some of the nation's largest rivers. Over...

Lessons From The Grand Canyon: Dams Destabilize River Food Webs
2013-08-20 10:22:02

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbance. So reports a new study in the journal Ecological Monographs, based on an exhaustive three-year analysis of the Colorado River in Glen and Grand Canyons. Food webs are used to map feeding relationships. By describing the structure of these webs, scientists can predict how plants and animals living in an ecosystem will respond to...

Black-legged Ticks Causing Encephalitis In New York State
2013-07-15 12:52:38

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies Researchers urge citizens and healthcare providers to be vigilant The number of tick-borne illnesses reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the rise. Lyme disease leads the pack, with some 35,000 cases reported annually. In the Northeast, the black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) that spread Lyme disease also infect people with other maladies, among them anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and -- as a new paper in the journal...

2012-11-20 22:51:03

Understanding warming requires long term studies that account for real-life complexity In the northern hardwood forest, climate change is poised to reduce the viability of the maple syrup industry, spread wildlife diseases and tree pests, and change timber resources. And, according to a new BioScience paper just released by twenty-one scientists, without long-term studies at the local scale–we will be ill-prepared to predict and manage these effects. Following an exhaustive review...

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2011-08-02 12:36:27

Site design and location can minimize carbon dioxide, methane emissions An international team of scientists has amassed the largest data set to date on greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs. Their analysis, published August 1 in the online version of Nature Geoscience, posits that these human-made systems emit about 1/6 of the carbon dioxide and methane previously attributed to them. Prior studies based on more limited data cautioned that hydroelectric reservoirs could be a...

2011-02-17 16:52:28

Forest biomass could replace as much as one quarter of the liquid fossil fuel now being used for industrial and commercial heating in the Northeastern United States. That's according to a new report released today by the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. But the report also has sharp caveats: The potential for forest biomass varies widely within the region, and forest resources must be carefully managed to protect the other important services and goods they provide. Under the right...

2011-02-15 16:52:00

MILLBROOK, N.Y., Feb. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- On February 17th, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies will be releasing a new report on the outlook for converting forest biomass into renewable energy in the Northeast. Forest Biomass and Bioenergy: Opportunities and Constraints in the Northeastern United States details the availability of forest resources and the applications that are the most effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and foreign oil dependence while promoting rural...

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2011-02-10 09:09:05

A coupled-cycles framework is essential to balancing human needs with the health of the planet If society wants to address big picture environmental problems, like global climate change, acid rain, and coastal dead zones, we need to pay closer attention to the Earth's coupled biogeochemical cycles. So reports a special issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, published this month by the Ecological Society of America. "There are nearly seven billion people on the planet. And our...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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