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Latest Catenin Stories

2014-05-23 11:10:34

UCSB UCSB study shows that key protein in epithelial cells plays important roles in how cells sense direction What do sled dogs and cell clusters have in common? According to research by UC Santa Barbara’s Denise Montell, they both travel in groups and need a leader to make sure they all follow in the same direction. Montell, Duggan Professor of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, and colleagues worked on three independent projects involving E-cadherin, a protein found in...

2013-10-08 09:44:05

Two gene alterations pair up to promote the growth of leukemia cells and their escape from anti-cancer drugs, according to a study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an aggressive cancer of the blood that is often treated with a drug called Imatinib (a.k.a. Gleevec). Although Gleevec is highly effective, some cancer cells can develop resistance to the drug. The mechanism that drives this resistance is not completely understood, but there is evidence...

2013-01-07 10:59:04

Scientists know that cells in all higher organisms cells need to bind to each other for the development, architecture, maintenance and function of tissues. Mysteries have remained, however, about exactly how cells manage this feat. Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have now solved part of this puzzle by defining the structure of a protein known as α-catenin, which is essential to this process. The work was published online ahead of...

2012-04-05 21:10:02

Researchers reporting in the April Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, have found a way to stop leukemia stem cells in their tracks. The advance in mice suggests that a combination approach to therapy might stamp out chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) for good. That's in contrast to the vast majority of CML patients taking drugs like imatinib (aka Gleevec) today, who often go into remission only to see their cancer return again. It is those lingering leukemia stem cells, which stubbornly...

2011-11-07 13:03:26

Findings point to possible personalized brain tumor therapy with Src inhibitors The embryonic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has a well-established role in metabolism and is highly expressed in human cancers. Now, a team led by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in advance online publication of the journal Nature that PKM2 has important non-metabolic functions in cancer formation. "Our research shows that although PKM2 plays an important role in...

2011-10-24 09:07:16

Previously unknown role of FoxM1 is crucial to regulation of brain tumor stem cells Two previously unassociated proteins known to be overly active in a variety of cancers bind together to ignite and sustain malignant brain tumors, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports this week in the journal Cancer Cell. This research is the first to connect FoxM1 to a molecular signaling cascade that regulates normal neural stem cells, said...

2011-08-15 14:06:00

Breakthrough discovery is likely to advance medicine and human health Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have gained new insight into the delicate relationship between two proteins that, when out of balance, can prevent the normal development of stem cells in the heart and may also be important in some types of cancer. "The news, being announced in a paper published online today in Nature Cell Biology, adds to the understanding of the role of stem cells in embryonic heart development, and...

2011-07-11 20:35:32

EDITOR'S PICK: Do-it-yourself brain repair following stroke Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and death in the United States. A team of researchers "” led by Gregory Bix, at Texas A&M College of Medicine, College Station "” has identified a way to exploit one of the brain's self-repair mechanisms to protect nerve cells and enhance brain repair in rodent models of stroke. The authors suggest that this approach could provide a nontoxic treatment for stroke. The...

2011-06-30 19:19:16

PTPN23 can regulate the SRC oncoprotein; basis for a new therapeutic approach Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified an enzyme that appears to be a significant regulator of breast cancer development. Called PTPN23, the enzyme is a member of a family called protein tyrosine phosphatases, or PTPs, that plays a fundamental role in switching cell signaling on and off. When the scientists suppressed the expression of PTPN23 in human mammary cells, they noted a cascade...

2011-05-23 07:25:36

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Researchers say they have discovered a new drug target for squamous cell carcinoma -- the second most common form of skin cancer. Each year, more than 700,000 new cases of squamous cell carcinoma are diagnosed. This type of skin cancer develops in the cells that make up most of the skin's upper layers. Squamous cell carcinomas are most commonly found in areas exposed to the sun such as the rim of the ear, lower lip, face, scalp, neck, hands, arms and legs. Investigators...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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