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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Latest Causes of schizophrenia Stories

2008-08-25 09:01:58

By JUDY SIEGEL Women who are in the second month of pregnancy when exposed to psychological stress in a war zone or other extreme traumatic events are significantly more likely to give birth to children who eventually develop schizophrenia, according to a just-published New York University School of Medicine study of babies born in Jerusalem seven months after the Six Day War. The mental disorder, found in 1 percent of Israelis, is characterized by paranoid or bizarre delusions,...

2008-08-21 15:01:07

Women pregnant in a war zone are more likely to give birth to a child who develops schizophrenia, New York researchers said. Lead author Dr. Dolores Malaspina, Anita Steckler and Joseph Steckler of the New York University School of Medicine said that the finding supports a growing body of literature that attributes maternal exposure to severe stress during the early months of pregnancy to an increased susceptibility to schizophrenia in the offspring. "The stresses in question are those...

2008-08-04 21:00:08

British, German and Chinese researchers say they've determined schizophrenia is an unfortunate consequence of the rapid evolution of the human brain. The researchers, led by Philipp Khaitovich of the Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Shanghai branch of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, examined the brains of humans with and without schizophrenia and compared them with chimpanzee and rhesus macaque brains. Khaitovich said the scientists searched for differences in...

2008-08-01 18:00:04

By Madeleine Brindley Health Editor PEOPLE with one of the most serious and misunderstood mental health disorders are today given fresh hope of improved treatments. A team of scientists from Cardiff University have made a major breakthrough in schizophrenia research by identifying the genes associated with the disease. And they also revealed that the genetic variations associated with schizophrenia are present in the wider population. The discovery is expected to...

2008-08-01 06:00:03

By Nicholas Wade Two groups of researchers hunting for schizophrenia genes on a larger scale than ever before have found new genetic variants that point toward a different understanding of the disease. The variants discovered by the two groups, one led by Dr. Kari Stefansson of Decode Genetics in Iceland and the other by Dr. Pamela Sklar of Massachusetts General Hospital in the United States, are rare. They substantially increase the risk of schizophrenia but account for a tiny fraction...

2008-07-31 18:00:17

By Madeleine Brindley Health Editor PEOPLE with one of the most stigmatised mental health disorders were last night given fresh hope of improved treatment. A team of scientists from Cardiff University have made a major breakthrough in schizophrenia research by identifying the genes associated with the disease. And they also revealed that the genetic variations associated with schizophrenia are present in the wider population. The discovery is expected to eventually lead to a better...

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2008-07-31 08:15:00

Two large global studies show that people who lack certain pieces of DNA have a significantly greater risk of getting schizophrenia. The finding could lead to a better understanding of how to diagnose the illness. The lack of DNA only occurs in less that 1 percent of schizophrenics, but each deletion increases the risk by nearly 15-fold. Researchers say that studying such irregularities may help them discover new medications by revealing what causes the illness. If enough rare deviations can...

2008-07-31 00:00:06

By Steve Connor Science Editor Scientists have identified three faults in human DNA that are linked with schizophrenia in a study that could open the way to a fundamental understanding of an illness that affects one in every hundred people at some time in their lives. Until now scientists have had little insight into what goes wrong within the brain when schizophrenia is diagnosed. So identifying faults in the DNA of brain cells promises to lead to novel therapies as well as new ways of...

2008-07-09 00:00:29

Using marijuana appears to contribute to schizophrenia symptoms, according to research reported today by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists. A part of the brain that is key to cognitive processes, such as memory, is impaired by one of the main chemical ingredients of marijuana. Because people with schizophrenia have a deficit in this part of the brain, it is worsened when they smoke marijuana, according to the research published in the Archives of General Psychiatry....

2008-07-08 21:00:31

Alterations in a molecular brain pathway activated by marijuana may contribute to the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, U.S. researchers said. The study, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, said heavy marijuana use, particularly in adolescence, appears to be associated with an increased risk for the later development of schizophrenia. Dr. David A. Lewis of the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine said expression of the...