Quantcast
Biologists Try To Dig Endangered Pupfish Out Of Its Hole

Biologists Try To Dig Endangered Pupfish Out Of Its Hole

Sarah Yang, University of California - Berkeley Scientists estimate that fewer than 100 Devils Hole pupfish remain in their Mojave Desert home, but a conservation biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, is giving important guidance...

Latest Cave fish Stories

Hoosier cavefish
2014-06-01 02:35:21

Pensoft Publishers A new eyeless cavefish is described from Indiana and named after the Indiana Hoosiers. It is the first new cavefish species described from the U.S. in 40 years. Notably, it has an anus right behind its head, and the females brood their young in their gill chamber. The new species was described in the open access journal ZooKeys. The new species, Amblyopsis hoosieri, is the closest relative of a species (A. spelaea) from the longest cave system in the world, Mammoth...

hybrid cavefish skull
2014-04-05 06:21:02

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A newly-identified genetic association with facial asymmetry in ancient cavefish could shed new light into mysteries surrounding conditions such as cleft palate or hemifacial microsomia in humans, according to research appearing in a recent edition of the peer-reviewed journal Genetics. Joshua Gross, an assistant professor in the University of Cincinnati’s Department of Biological Sciences, and his colleagues compared the...

Blind Cavefish Offer Evidence For Long-debated Mechanism Of Evolutionary Change
2013-12-13 11:16:07

Marine Biological Laboratory In a blind fish that dwells in deep, dark Mexican caves, scientists have found evidence for a long-debated mechanism of evolutionary change that is distinct from natural selection of spontaneously arising mutations, as reported this week in the journal Science. The eyeless cavefish Astyanas mexicanus is "a special system in which we can look at evolution in action," says article co-author William Jeffery, a senior adjunct scientist at the Marine Biological...

Closest Relatives To Eyeless Australian Fish Are In Madagascar
2012-08-29 14:13:26

Researchers are first to show ancient trans-oceanic relationship for vertebrate cave animals A team of researchers from Louisiana State University and the American Museum of Natural History has discovered that two groups of blind cave fishes on opposite sides of the Indian Ocean are each other's closest relatives. Through comprehensive DNA analysis, the researchers determined that these eyeless fishes, one group from Madagascar and the other from similar subterranean habitats in Australia,...

2012-01-23 13:13:31

The blind Mexican cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) have not only lost their sight but have adapted to perpetual darkness by also losing their pigment (albinism) and having altered sleep patterns. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology shows that the cavefish are an example of convergent evolution, with several populations repeatedly, and independently, losing their sight and pigmentation. The blind cavefish and the surface dwelling Mexican...

2011-04-08 13:13:16

Cave life is known to favor the evolution of a variety of traits, including blindness and loss of eyes, loss of pigmentation, and changes in metabolism and feeding behavior. Now researchers reporting online on April 7 in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have added sleeplessness to that list. "Cave-adapted fish sleep less"”much less"”than closely related surface fish," said Richard Borowsky of New York University. "In some ways, their sleep phenotypes are similar to those...

2010-09-15 15:44:16

University of Maryland biologists show how evolutionary changes helped compensate for the loss of vision in Mexican blind cavefish University of Maryland biologists have identified how changes in both behavior and genetics led to the evolution of the Mexican blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) from its sighted, surface-dwelling ancestor. In research published in the August 12, 2010 online edition of the journal Current Biology, Professor William Jeffery, together with postdoctoral associates...

10b80b0a21b09ffd7ea6ad06cae11c9e1
2010-05-12 10:25:00

For the first time, an earthquake was recorded live in Devils Hole, home to the only population of a critically endangered pupfish species. To most people in the southwestern U.S., the April 4 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake felt like a rocking of the ground. But on a group of inch-long fish that exist nowhere else on Earth outside of "Devils Hole," a crack in the ground in Nevada's Mojave Desert, it unleashed a veritable tsunami. University of Arizona researchers were able to catch the event on...

2008-10-10 06:00:22

By Keith Rogers By KEITH ROGERS REVIEW-JOURNAL Tiny neon-blue pupfish that are struggling to survive in a spring- fed cave in Nye County have rebounded this fall to 126 adult fish, 34 more than last fall's count and the highest number recorded since 2004, a federal biologist said Wednesday. "We're feeling pretty good," said Bob Williams, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service field supervisor for Nevada. "We're feeling like we're at least maintaining the population. There is still lots...

2008-08-25 09:00:59

By Randal C. Archibold No doubt, it is hard to be a fish in a desert. But, to the dismay and bafflement of scientists, the Devils Hole pupfish, a quick-darting iridescent blue minnow, are veering toward extinction. Maybe this should not be surprising, considering their home: a hellishly hot, spring-fed pool of undetermined depth in the middle of one of the hottest places on earth. The fish, for tens of thousands of years, have lived here and only here, in an isolated patch under the...


Latest Cave fish Reference Libraries

Cavefish, Amblyopsidae
2014-08-06 09:52:18

Amblyopsidae is a family that holds six species of cavefish, also known as blindfish or swampfish, that reside in swampy and dark waters in eastern areas of the United States. Although there are over 170 species of cavefish, only six of these are classified in the Amblyopsidae family, some of which reside in swamps, while others reside in the water systems of caves like those in the Mammoth Caves in the state of Kentucky. Some of the most notable of these species include Chologaster cornuta,...

39_05e4d529d11a58745888efa235004241
2007-04-13 19:46:39

The Devil's Hole pupfish, Cyprinodon diabolis, is an endangered species of fish native to Devil's Hole, a geothermal (92°F), aquifer-fed pool within a limestone cavern in the Amargosa Desert of Nevada east of Death Valley. It is the smallest desert pupfish species, averaging .75 in (19 mm) in length. Physical Description Devil's Hole pupfish are less than .98 in (2.5 cm) long and resemble other pupfish in shape. They lack pelvic fins and have large heads and long anal fins. Breeding...

39_a218659b2845525b6c1153bf259a0998
2007-03-26 13:47:14

Astyanax jordani is a freshwater fish of the Characin family (family Characidae) of order Characiformes, native to Mexico. It is often referred to by its local Spanish name Sardina Ciega but is more commonly called the Cave tetra. A blind cave fish, A. jordani is a recent evolution from the Mexican tetra (A. mexicanus). While it can be confused with the blind cave form of A. mexicanus, it evolved separately from the surface form, and is considered a different species. (IUCN, however,...

39_51287bca697590814eca67b6fd700e38
2007-02-13 15:17:56

The Northern cavefish or Northern blindfish, Amblyopsis spelea, is found in caves through Kentucky and southern Indiana. It is listed as a threatened species in the United States and the IUCN lists the species as vulnerable. The White River, flowing east to west south of Bedford, Indiana, delimits the northern range of Amblyopsis spelea. These fish are not found in caves north of the White River.

39_4e7ab7fa75234d6e97e6163fee9dc616
2007-02-13 15:16:34

The Ozark cavefish, Amblyopsis rosae, is a small subterranean freshwater fish native to the United States. It has been listed as a threatened species in the United States since 1984; the IUCN lists the species as vulnerable. The Ozark cavefish is pinkish-white and reaches a maximum length of 2 in (5 cm). The head is flattened, and it has a slightly protruding lower jaw. The fish has no pelvic fin; the dorsal and anal fins are farther back than on most fish. The Ozark cavefish has only...

More Articles (5 articles) »
Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
Related