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Latest Cave painting Stories

Cave Paintings Found In Brazil Date Back To Ancient Hunter-Gatherers
2013-11-12 04:39:11

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society and a local non-governmental organization, Instituto Quinta do Sol were recently tracking white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari) and gathering data in Brazil's Pantanal and Cerrado biomes when they discovered ancient cave drawings made by hunter-gatherer societies thousands of years ago. The findings, published in the journal Revista Clio Arqueológica, demonstrate that...

Rock Art Provides Insight Into Prehistoric Native American Societies
2013-06-20 05:46:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Perhaps the most widespread and oldest art in the US, prehistoric rock art can be found throughout the Appalachian Mountains. A new study led by University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) anthropology professor Jan Simek reveals that each engraving or drawing is strategically placed to reveal a cosmological puzzle. As the discoveries of prehistoric rock art have become more commonplace, the evidence is building that all of the drawings...

Archaeologists Discover Several Thousand Ancient Cave Paintings In Mexico
2013-05-23 15:29:14

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Archaeologists have discovered several thousand paintings in caves and ravines of the Sierra de San Carlos, Municipality of Burgos, Tamaulipas. The 4,926 paintings found were made by at least three groups of hunter-gatherers in the region. The paintings are anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, astronomical and abstract. Archaeologist Gustavo Ramirez, who led the team, said the paintings are important because it documents the presence of...

Cavemen Drew Animals Better Than Modern Artists
2012-12-06 16:18:40

Public Library of Science Animal gait was depicted more accurately in cave paintings than in modern art Prehistoric artists were better at portraying the walk of four-legged animals in their art than modern man, according to new research published December 5 in the open access journal PLoS ONE by Gabor Horvath and colleagues from Eotvos University (Budapest), Hungary. Most quadrupeds have a similar sequence in which they move each limb as they walk, trot or run, and this sequence was...

Could Neanderthals Have Been the First Cave Artists?
2012-06-15 07:10:15

By using a new cutting-edge dating technique, researchers have discovered that the practice of painting cave art started as early as 40,000 years ago, or 10,000 years earlier than previously believed. A team of British, Spanish and Portuguese researchers, led by Dr. Alistair Pike of the University of Bristol, investigated some 50 paintings in 11 different caves in northern Spain. Since the paintings had no organic pigment, they could not use radiocarbon dating to determine their age, so...

Anthropologists Discover World’s Earliest Known Wall Art
2012-05-15 06:03:03

Numerous engraved and painted images of female sex organs, animals and geometric figures discovered in southern France are believed to be the world´s earliest known cave art. Radiocarbon dating of the engravings, found on a 1.5 metric ton block of limestone in Chauvet Cave in southeastern France, revealed that the art was created some 37,000 years ago. The cave resides near the areas of Abri Castanet and Abri Blanchard - where some of the oldest examples of mankind living in...

DNA Study Sheds Light On Ancient Cave Paintings Of Horses
2011-11-08 06:28:45

Ancient cave painters were realists rather than dreamers, at least when it came to depicting horses, according to an analysis of pre-historic horse DNA.  Humans began painting curious creatures -- white horses with black spots -- on the walls of European caves about 25,000 years ago. These horses, while popular breeds today, were thought not to exist before humans domesticated the species about 5000 years ago, leading scientists to wonder how much imagination went into the...

Image 1 - World’s Earliest Art Studio Uncovered In Cape Town Cave
2011-10-14 05:59:35

[ Watch the Video ] Archaeologists have uncovered two shells near the southern coast of South Africa that contain a primitive paint mixture, revealing what experts believe may be the remnants of the world´s earliest art studio. The 100,000-year-old workshop was likely used to mix and store the reddish pigment ochre, and was unearthed in Blombos Cave near Cape Town.  The scientists had previously found some of the earliest sharp stone tools at this same site, along with...

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2011-04-25 11:30:00

Known today for its bloody conflicts and instability, Somalia's little known history can be found in the colorful cave paintings of animals and humans discovered in 2002 by a French archaeology team. Laas Gaal, Somalia (also known as Laas Geel), just outside of Haregeisa, the capital of Somalia's self-declared Somaliland state, contains 10 caves that show vivid depictions of a pastoralist history which dates back to some 5,000 years or more, reports AFP. A French archaeology team was sent in...

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2010-03-26 13:50:00

This question isn't new, but for years anthropologists, archaeologists and historians of art understood these artistic manifestations as purely aesthetic and decorative motives. Eduardo Palacio-P©rez, researcher at the University of Cantabria (UC), now reveals the origins of a theory that remains nowadays/lasts into our days. "This theory is does not originate with the prehistorians, in other words, those who started to develop the idea that the art of primitive peoples was linked...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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