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Latest CD36 Stories

2014-04-02 15:37:00

Discovery could lead to more effective therapies to prevent heart attacks Right now, options are limited for preventing heart attacks. However, the day may come when treatments target the heart attack gene, myeloid related protein-14 (MRP-14, also known as S100A9) and defang its ability to produce heart attack-inducing blood clots, a process referred to as thrombosis. Scientists at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have reached a...

2012-08-01 23:07:09

The deadliest form of malaria is caused the protozoan Plasmodium falciparum. During its life-cycle in human blood, the parasite P. falciparum expresses unique proteins on the surface on infected blood cells. Antibodies to these proteins are associated with protection from malaria, however, the identity of surface protein(s) that elicit the strongest immune response is unknown. Dr. James Beeson and colleagues at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Victoria, Australia...

2012-06-25 10:30:13

Researchers find a simple way of avoiding dangerous side effects The commonly-used epilepsy drug, valproic acid (VPA), can have a highly beneficial effect on some babies born with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the number one genetic killer during early infancy. But in about two-thirds of such cases it is either damaging or simply has no effect. Now, for the first time, researchers have found a way to identify which patients are likely to respond well to VPA prior to starting treatment....

2012-04-18 22:09:01

American Heart Association scientific meeting news tip A protein involved in cellular inflammation may increase the risk of plaque containing blood vessels associated with inflammatory gum disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 2012 Scientific Sessions in Chicago. The protein, CD36, is found in blood cells, as well as many other cell types. Research has shown that CD36 may increase the harmful...

2012-03-23 13:15:08

While high-fat foods are thought to be of universal appeal, there is actually a lot of variation in the extent to which people like and consume fat. A new study in the March issue of the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, reported that two specific genes (TAS2R38—a bitter taste receptor and CD36—a possible fat receptor), may play a role in some people's ability to taste and enjoy dietary fat. By understanding the role of these two genes,...

2012-03-05 23:27:16

Does fat have a taste? About five years ago, animal studies first revealed the presence of entirely novel types of oral fat sensors or receptors on the tongue. Prior to this time, it was believed that fats were perceived only by flavor and texture cues. With this new information, “everything that we thought we knew about fat perception got turned on its head,” said Beverly Tepper, a professor in the Department of Food Science at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological...

2012-02-03 19:00:20

A preference for fatty foods has a genetic basis, according to researchers, who discovered that people with certain forms of the CD36 gene may like high-fat foods more than those who have other forms of this gene. The results help explain why some people struggle when placed on a low-fat diet and may one day assist people in selecting diets that are easier for them to follow. The results also may help food developers create new low-fat foods that taste better. "Fat is universally...

2012-01-18 21:33:00

The discovery by researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of a molecule that is key to malaria's 'invisibility cloak' will help to better understand how the parasite causes disease and escapes from the defenses mounted by the immune system. The research team, led by Professor Alan Cowman from the institute's Infection and Immunity division, has identified one of the crucial molecules that instructs the parasite to employ its invisibility cloak to hide from the immune system,...

2012-01-12 21:43:00

Why do we like fatty foods so much? We can blame our taste buds. Our tongues apparently recognize and have an affinity for fat, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. They have found that variations in a gene can make people more or less sensitive to the taste of fat. The study is the first to identify a human receptor that can taste fat and suggests that some people may be more sensitive to the presence of fat in foods. The study is available...

2011-08-25 14:48:38

Parkinson disease (PD) is a relatively common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1-2% of the world's population over the age of 65 years. About 5-10% of PD cases are inherited, and mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of familial PD. Michael Sack and colleagues, at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, have now identified a new function for the protein templated by the Parkin gene, it regulates fat uptake from the blood by liver cells and thereby fat levels in the blood....


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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