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Latest CD4 Stories

2011-02-25 13:03:10

A new finding from scientists at the National Institutes of Health could help efforts to design vaccines and other prevention tools to block HIV in the early stages of sexual transmission, before infection takes hold. Researchers at the NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have helped explain genetic differences that can distinguish some early-transmitting HIVs"”viruses found in an infected individual within the first month after infection"”from forms of HIV...

2011-01-24 15:11:20

HIV's Trickery within the Macrophage Revealed HIV adapts in a surprising way to survive and thrive in its hiding spot within the human immune system, scientists have learned. While the finding helps explain why HIV remains such a formidable foe after three decades of research "“ more than 30 million people worldwide are infected with HIV "“ it also offers scientists a new, unexpected way to try to stop the virus. The work by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical...

2010-12-09 07:00:00

DURHAM, N.C., Dec. 9, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Argos Therapeutics announced today that its Arcelis HIV immunotherapy, AGS-004, showed feasibility in in vitro models to generate fully functional dendritic cells (DC) from viremic patients. Argos plans to start a Phase 1 trial of AGS-004 to test the prevention or delay in the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ART-naive patients. Data were presented orally and in a poster at the HIV DART(TM) 2010 Conference in Los Cabos, Mexico....

2010-11-24 11:45:44

Gladstone investigators solve long-standing HIV mystery Scientists at Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology have solved a long-standing mystery about HIV infection"“namely how HIV promotes the death of CD4 T cells. It is the loss of this critical subset of immune cells that leads to the development of AIDS. Most immune cells that die during HIV infection are seemingly not infected, a phenomenon formerly described as "bystander cell killing." Now the Gladstone scientists report...

2010-11-24 11:40:55

Researchers appear to have an explanation for a longstanding question in HIV biology: how it is that the virus kills so many CD4 T cells, despite the fact that most of them appear to be "bystander" cells that are themselves not productively infected. That loss of CD4 T cells marks the progression from HIV infection to full-blown AIDS, explain the researchers who report their findings in studies of human tonsils and spleens in the November 24th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication. "In...

2010-11-22 18:59:58

Johns Hopkins study finds later treatment adds tens of thousands of dollars in care HIV infected patients whose treatment is delayed not only become sicker than those treated earlier, but also require tens of thousands of dollars more in care over the first several years of their treatment. "We know that it's important clinically to get people into care early because they will stay healthier and do better over the long run," says Kelly Gebo, M.D., M.P.H., an associate professor of medicine in...

2010-10-31 00:13:18

The CD4 Initiative at Imperial College, London, funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grants, is nearing a major breakthrough in HIV/AIDS care by developing a simple, inexpensive CD4 point-of-care test specifically designed for resource-poor settings. ImmunoSite Technologies has been developing QA materials for the innovative, disposable test kit. Fort Lauderdale, FL (PRWEB) October 30, 2010 Since early 2007, researchers from ImmunoSite Technologies (IST) have been working with a...

2010-10-08 02:22:15

In a technical tour de force, structural biologists funded by the National Institutes of Health have determined the three-dimensional structure of a molecule involved in HIV infection and in many forms of cancer. The high-resolution structure sheds light on how the molecule functions and could point to ways to control its activity, potentially locking out HIV and stalling cancer's spread. The molecule, CXCR4, is part of a large family of proteins called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs)....

2010-07-20 08:30:00

VIENNA and NEW YORK, July 20 /PRNewswire/ -- The Abzyme Research Foundation announces today that Dr. Sudhir Paul, a scientist at University of Texas Houston Medical School, has identified an important immunological deficiency in HIV-infected patients and has created a promising HIV vaccine candidate that rectifies the deficiency. The discoveries were presented on July 19th and 20th, 2010 at the XVII International AIDS Society Conference in Vienna, Austria. The HIV vaccine candidate has...

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2010-07-18 09:41:53

Microfluidic device uses antibodies to 'capture' white blood cells called T cells affected by HIV UC Davis biomedical engineer Prof. Alexander Revzin has developed a "lab on a chip" device for HIV testing. Revzin's microfluidic device uses antibodies to "capture" white blood cells called T cells that are affected by HIV. In addition to physically binding these cells the test detects the types and levels of inflammatory proteins (cytokines) released by the cells. Revzin's team collaborated...