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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 13:31 EDT

Latest CD47 Stories

2013-04-17 15:52:31

Stem cells and tissue-specific cells can be grown in abundance from mature mammalian cells simply by blocking a certain membrane protein, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Their experiments, reported today in Scientific Reports, also show that the process doesn't require other kinds of cells or agents to artificially support cell growth and doesn't activate cancer genes. Scientists hope that lab-grown...

2012-09-06 02:31:04

TORONTO, Sept. 6, 2012 /PRNewswire/ - Trillium Therapeutics Inc. (TTI), a biopharmaceutical company developing innovative and proprietary immune-based biologics, today announced that preliminary results from its preclinical anti-CD47 oncology program have been published in the prestigious Journal of Experimental Medicine (Theocharides et al., published online Sep 3, 2012) The work was conducted in the laboratories of Trillium collaborators Drs. Jean Wang and John Dick at University...

2012-07-30 06:25:24

ROCKVILLE, Md., July 30, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Radiation Control Technologies, Inc. (RCTI), a private development stage biopharmaceutical company developing RCT1938, a novel radiosensitizer that sensitizes tumor cells to killing by radiation while protecting healthy cells from radiation damage by inhibiting the synthesis of the novel target protein CD47, announced today that it has been granted an exclusive license to two patents from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH exclusive...

2012-04-04 06:27:24

TORONTO, April 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ - Trillium Therapeutics Inc., a privately-held biopharmaceutical company developing proprietary and innovative biologic therapies, today provided an update on its lead cancer program - a SIRPaFc fusion protein targeting the CD47 pathway. Trillium's SIRPaFc development candidate is a proprietary antibody-like fusion protein that blocks the activity of CD47, a molecule upregulated on many leukemias and solid tumors. CD47 binds to SIRPa on the...

2012-03-27 08:38:49

Human tumors transplanted into laboratory mice disappeared or shrank when scientists treated the animals with a single antibody, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The antibody works by masking a protein flag on cancer cells that protects them from macrophages and other cells in the immune system. The scientists achieved the findings with human breast, ovarian, colon, bladder, brain, liver and prostate cancer samples. It is the first antibody...

2010-12-02 10:00:00

TORONTO, Dec. 2 /PRNewswire/ - Trillium Therapeutics Inc. (TTI), a biopharmaceutical company developing innovative immune-based biologics, today announced that preliminary results from its cancer stem cell program, targeting the CD47 protein, will be reported in an oral presentation at the 52nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting to be held in Orlando, Florida, December 4-7, 2010. The presentation, entitled "Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells Escape Innate Immune...

2009-10-21 15:42:40

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, may be hot on the heels of a Holy Grail of cancer therapy: They have found a way to not only protect healthy tissue from the toxic effects of radiation treatment, but also increase tumor death. The findings appear today in Science Translational Medicine. More than half of all cancer patients are treated at least in part with radiation, said study...

2009-08-03 19:20:29

Researchers at Stanford's School of Medicine have identified the first human bladder cancer stem cell and revealed how it works to escape the body's natural defenses."This is first time we've found this 'don't eat me signal' in a stem cell of a solid cancer," said Irving Weissman, MD, the Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research at the medical school. "We're now moving as fast as we can to look at other tumors to see if this is a universal strategy of...

2009-07-23 11:46:37

Human leukemia stem cells escape detection by co-opting a protective molecular badge used by normal blood stem cells to migrate safely within the body, according to a pair of studies by researchers at Stanford University Medical School."We call it the 'Don't eat me signal,'" said Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, assistant professor of hematology at the medical school and the co-first author of one of the studies, which focused on acute myeloid leukemia.Patients whose cancer stem cells express higher...

2009-07-23 11:42:35

Two new studies reveal a way to increase the body's appetite for gobbling up the cancer stem cells responsible for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of cancer with a particularly poor survival rate. The key is targeting a protein on the surface of those cells that sends a "don't eat me" signal to the macrophage immune cells that serve as a first line of defense, according to the reports in the July 24th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication.In essence, says Irving Weissman of...