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Latest Cell cycle Stories

2012-04-16 22:24:14

    The E2F family of genes is thought to play a crucial role in regulating cell proliferation.     It is unclear how these genes carry out their function and interact with one another in intact animals.     This study shows that two E2F repressor genes are essential for a functional placenta and for balancing the effect of an E2F activator gene. Two particular repressor genes in a family of regulatory genes are vital for controlling cell...

Sex, Tools And Chromosomes
2012-04-12 10:28:06

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a key tool that helps sperm and eggs develop exactly 23 chromosomes each. The work, which could lead to insights into fertility, spontaneous miscarriages, cancer and developmental disorders, is published April 13 in the journal Cell. Healthy humans have 46 chromosomes, 23 from the sperm and 23 from the egg. An embryo with the wrong number of chromosomes is usually miscarried, or develops disorders such as Down's syndrome,...

2012-03-12 20:14:42

Salk scientists' discovery explains how a class of chemotherapy drugs works The well-being of living cells requires specialized squads of proteins that maintain order. Degraders chew up worn-out proteins, recyclers wrap up damaged organelles, and-most importantly-DNA repair crews restitch anything that resembles a broken chromosome. If repair is impossible, the crew foreman calls in executioners to annihilate a cell. As unsavory as this last bunch sounds, failure to summon them is one...

2012-01-17 13:00:00

Estes Chairmanship Announced at 2012 Jump Start Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) January 17, 2012 SMC³ announced today that Rob W. Estes, Jr., president and CEO of Estes Express Lines, Inc. has assumed the chairmanship of the SMC³ board of directors effective January 16, 2012. As a long-term board member, Estes has played a key role in SMC³´s organizational and technological development. He noted, “Technology is SMC³´s strategic advantage. My hope is that the board...

2012-01-03 14:51:00

Scientists have found at least one instance when the smaller sibling gets to call the shots and cancer patients may one day benefit. The protein Chk1 has long been known to be a checkpoint in cell development: it keeps normal cells and damaged cells from dividing until their DNA has been fully replicated or repaired. Now scientists at Georgia Health Sciences University and the California Institute of Technology have discovered a shorter form they've dubbed Chk1-S ("S" stands for short)...

2011-12-23 08:00:00

The Bio Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes articles in all areas of biological science. The latest articles cover Interphase which is the phase of the cell cycle in which the cell conducts its regular cell functions including preparation for cell division, Prokaryotic Cells which do not have a membrane-bound nucleus and no chromosomal DNA, but their genetic information is stored in plasmids. The article on Anatomy and Physiology covers the structure and function of living organisms which...

2011-12-12 16:15:22

Scientists show how cells accurately inherit information that is not contained in their genes All 10 trillion cells in the adult human body are genetically identical, but develop into distinct cell types, such as muscle cells, skin cells or neurons, by activating some genes while inhibiting others. Remarkably, each specialized cell maintains a memory of their individual identity by remembering which genes should be kept on or off, even when making copies of themselves. This type of memory...

How Old Yeast Cells Send Off Their Daughter Cells Without The Baggage Of Old Age
2011-11-24 04:40:35

[ Watch the Video ] The accumulation of damaged protein is a hallmark of aging that not even the humble baker's yeast can escape. Yet, aged yeast cells spawn off youthful daughter cells without any of the telltale protein clumps. Now, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research may have found an explanation for the observed asymmetrical distribution of damaged proteins between mothers and their youthful daughters. Reporting in the Nov. 23, 2011, issue of Cell the research...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.