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Latest Cell cycle Stories

2011-06-30 17:58:14

New information from fission yeast provides clues for research on cancer treatments When a cell divides, the genetic information in the chromosomes must be passed on error-free to the daughter cells. Researchers at the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory in Tbingen are studying this process using fission yeast as a model organism. In cooperation with researchers at the University of Tbingen, they succeeded in attributing additional tasks to the Aurora enzymes, which were already recognized as...

2011-06-09 23:33:23

Blocking cyclin D1 might help sensitize tumors to radiation Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have uncovered a new role for a key cancer protein, a finding that could pave the way for more-effective radiation treatment of a variety of tumors. Many cancers are driven in part by elevated levels of cyclin D1, which allow the cells to escape growth controls and proliferate abnormally. In the new research, reported in the June 9 issue of Nature, researchers discovered that cyclin D1 also...

2011-02-11 21:07:03

Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have developed a novel treatment strategy for multiple myeloma that pairs two targeted agents to kill cancer cells. The study's findings, published in today's edition of the journal "Blood," are the first to demonstrate the synergistic, anti-myeloma effects of this combination regimen both in vitro and in vivo. Multiple myeloma is a cancer involving antibody-producing cells in the bone marrow, and, in most cases, is...

2010-12-07 15:36:06

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered a central switch that controls whether cells move or remain stationary. The misregulation of this switch may play a role in the increased movement of tumor cells and in the aggressiveness of tumors themselves. "Malignant cancer arises when cancer cells acquire the ability to move away from their primary tissue location," said Natalia Starostina assistant research scientist in the UGA department of cellular biology and lead author of the...

2010-12-01 22:49:16

University of Michigan researchers have discovered that a protein known to regulate cellular metabolism is also necessary for normal cell division in blood-forming stem cells. Loss of the protein results in an abnormal number of chromosomes and a high rate of cell death. The finding demonstrates that stem cells are metabolically different from other blood-forming cells, which can divide without the protein, Lkb1. This metabolic difference could someday be used to better control the behavior...

2010-11-25 22:08:47

Accurate gene distribution during cell division depends on stable set-up Scientists have discovered an amazingly simple way that cells stabilize their machinery for forcing apart chromosomes. Their findings are reported Nov. 25 in Nature. When a cell gets ready to split into new cells, this stable set-up permits its genetic material to be separated and distributed accurately. Otherwise, problem cells "“ like cancer cells"” arise. The human body contains more than a trillion cells,...

2010-11-22 15:58:00

Discovery may shed light on cancer genesis Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah report that they have identified a previously undiscovered trigger mechanism for a quality control checkpoint at the very end of the cell division process in a paper to be published in the November 29 issue of The Journal of Cell Biology and online today. This trigger mechanism monitors whether the cell's nucleus, where the DNA resides, has the proper structure and delays cell...

2010-11-17 17:08:28

Teams from UK and Germany publish research in Nature Cell Biology New research that provides potential for exciting new approaches to targeting diseases such as cancer has been announced by an international team of academics. They have also announced the potential for more targeted treatments following their identification of proteins that play a vital role in the life of a human cell. The research teams from Germany and the UK have published their work in the Advance Online Publication on...

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2010-11-16 13:38:19

Dr. Joseph Glavy at Stevens Institute of Technology studies the smallest and most basic elements of life. The Assistant Professor of Chemical Biology runs the Glavy Lab, where advanced student scientists study the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in cells, observing the minutest mechanisms of life as they unfold during mitosis. The Glavy Lab's formal purpose is to study the NPC at the molecular level in the pursuit of the unknown or unexpected in the well-studied but not always well-understood...

2010-11-09 06:00:00

ROCKVILLE, Md., Nov. 9, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- EntreMed, Inc. (Nasdaq: ENMD), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing therapeutics for the treatment of cancer, today announced presentations for its Phase 2 oncology drug candidate, ENMD-2076. Data for the ENMD-2076 Phase 1 studies in multiple myeloma and leukemia will be presented by EntreMed investigators at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to be held December 4-7 at the Orange County...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.