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Latest Cell cycle Stories

2010-06-23 01:18:38

Researchers at Virginia Tech, New York University (NYU), and the University of Milan, Italy, have created a data mining algorithm they call GOALIE that can automatically reveal how biological processes are coordinated in time. Biological processes such as cell division, metabolism, and development must be carefully synchronized for proper cell function. How such events are coordinated in time is a complex problem in the field of systems biology. While researchers can gather temporal data...

2010-06-15 00:49:48

A new study reveals how conflict resolution works on the microscopic scale "“ a protein called Flower marks the weaker cells for elimination in favor of their fitter neighbors. The research, published by Cell Press in the June 15th issue of the journal Developmental Cell, furthers our understanding of a developmental process of "cell competition" and may provide some insight into pathological conditions that involve imbalances in cell fitness, such as cancer. During development, a cell...

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2010-06-11 07:03:10

Nuclear pores are the primary gatekeepers mediating communication between a cell's nucleus and its cytoplasm. Recently these large multiprotein transport channels have also been shown to play an essential role in developmental gene regulation. Despite the critical role in nuclear function, however, nuclear pore complexes remain somewhat shadowy figures, with many details about their formation shrouded in mystery. Now a team of investigators from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has...

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2010-05-18 06:44:24

Caltech-led team provides evidence of key roles for cell-cycle length and chromosome duplication without division The sepals of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana"”commonly known as the mouse-eared cress"”are characterized by an outer layer of cells that vary widely in their sizes, and are distributed in equally varied patterns and proportions. Scientists have long wondered how the plant regulates cell division to create these patterns"”in other words, how it decides which and...

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2010-05-07 08:59:35

Proteins called cohesins ensure that newly copied chromosomes bind together, separate correctly during cell division, and are repaired efficiently after DNA damage. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found for the first time that cohesins are needed in different concentrations for their different functions. This discovery helps to explain how certain developmental disorders, such as Cornelia de Lange and Roberts Syndrome arise without affecting cell division essential to development....

2010-04-13 14:58:50

The tumor suppressor Retinoblastoma represses DNA replication genes during senescence A frequently mutated gene in human cancers is the reitnoblastoma (RB) gene, which controls a potent tumor suppression pathway. Mutations in the gene disable the vast and intricate RB pathway in virtually all tumor cells, leading to disturbances in a host of cellular functions and ultimately provoking cancer. But which of these functions is crucial for the gene's tumor-suppressing activity has been...

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2010-03-10 08:10:43

If you can imagine identical twin sisters at rest, their breath drawing them subtly together and apart, who somehow latch onto ropes that pull them to opposite sides of the bed"”you can imagine what happens to a chromosome in the dividing cell. Understanding the forces that drive chromosome segregation "“ a crucial aspect of human development and some diseases, including cancer "“ is the goal of an international group of researchers who collaborate each summer at the MBL. In...

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2010-02-22 09:05:02

Regulatory proteins common to all eukaryotic cells can have additional, unique functions in embryonic stem (ES) cells, according to a study in the February 22 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. If cancer progenitor cells"”which function similarly to stem cells"”are shown to rely on these regulatory proteins in the same way, it may be possible to target them therapeutically without harming healthy neighboring cells. The new study, by Thomas Fazzio and Barbara Panning (University...

2010-02-09 15:22:11

M. D. Anderson researchers find better way to predict prognosis in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors; research also suggests a potential means of circumventing drug resistance Overexpression of low-molecular-weight (LMW-E) forms of the protein cyclin E renders the aromatase inhibitor letrozole ineffective among women with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers, researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report in Clinical Cancer Research. The M. D....

2010-01-14 12:39:47

Chromosomes move faster than we first thought. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal, Genome Biology, details new findings about the way chromosomes move around the nucleus when leaving the proliferative stage of the cell cycle and entering quiescence "“ and the unexpected speed at which they move. Researchers from Brunel University's Institute for Cancer Genetics and Pharmacogenomics have been trying to understand how human chromosomes occupy different territories...