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Latest Cell division Stories

2011-01-13 11:04:00

NEW YORK, Jan. 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Telomerase Activation Sciences, Inc. (T.A. Sciences) today announced the issuance of U.S. Patent No. 7,846,904 to the Geron Corporation. The patent covers the use of certain compounds to upregulate telomerase expression in cells. T.A. Sciences has exclusive worldwide rights to technology under this patent for nutraceutical and cosmetic applications. "This foundational patent is a validation of the millions of dollars and more than 8 years of...

2010-09-08 16:56:00

RENO, Nev., Sept. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Sierra Sciences, in collaboration with TA Sciences, Geron Corporation, PhysioAge, and the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), has announced the first compound ever discovered that activates the enzyme telomerase in the human body - a critical prerequisite for technology that could arrest or reverse the aging process in humans. This compound is a natural product derived nutraceutical known as TA-65. These findings appear as a research article...

2010-07-01 15:10:22

How do plants and animals end up with right number of cells in all the right places? For the first time, scientists have gained an insight into how this process is co-ordinated in plants. An international team, including Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Duke University in the USA, have linked the process of cell division with the way cells acquire their different characteristics. A protein called Short-root, already known to play a part in determining what cells will become, was...

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2010-06-28 10:45:51

Scientists from the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, are the first to directly measure a specific region of DNA in human embryos. The length of this region could be a quality marker for embryonic development. Researchers at the University of Warwick's Warwick Medical School and University Hospital, Coventry, have measured telomeres, regions of repetitive DNA at the ends of a chromosome which protect it from deterioration. Telomeres shorten...

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2010-05-18 06:44:24

Caltech-led team provides evidence of key roles for cell-cycle length and chromosome duplication without division The sepals of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana"”commonly known as the mouse-eared cress"”are characterized by an outer layer of cells that vary widely in their sizes, and are distributed in equally varied patterns and proportions. Scientists have long wondered how the plant regulates cell division to create these patterns"”in other words, how it decides which and...

2009-12-01 07:34:12

Intensive exercise prevented shortening of telomeres, a protective effect against aging of the cardiovascular system, according to research reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers measured the length of telomeres "” the DNA that bookends the chromosomes and protects the ends from damage "” in blood samples from two groups of professional athletes and two groups who were healthy nonsmokers, but not regular exercisers. The telomere shortening...

2009-10-05 08:43:00

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Molecular biologist Elizabeth H. Blackburn, PhD, 60, of the University of California, San Francisco, today was named to receive the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Blackburn shares the award with Carol W. Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Jack W. Szostak of Harvard Medical School. The scientists discovered an enzyme that plays a key role in normal cell function, as well as in cell aging and most...

2009-09-01 13:06:37

A process that limits the number of times a cell divides works much differently than had been thought, opening the door to potential new anticancer therapies, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center report in the Aug. 7 issue of the journal Cell.Most cells in the human body divide only a certain number of times, via a countdown mechanism that stops them. When the controlling process goes wrong, the cells divide indefinitely, contributing to cancer growth.The number of times a cell...

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2009-03-30 08:41:25

How your brain grows might come down to how your cells divide. In the April 6 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Lake and Sokol report that mouse protein Vangl2 controls the asymmetrical cell division and developmental fate of progenitor neurons. Vangl2 (aka Strabismus in flies) is a component of the PCP (planar cell polarity) pathway that is active in a variety of tissues and organisms. Mice that lack Vangl2 have a number of neurological defects including incomplete neural tube...

2009-01-30 09:23:21

Last week, a presidential limousine shuttled Barack Obama to the most important job in his life. Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have now identified a protein that does much the same for the telomerase enzyme "” ferrying the critically important clump of proteins around to repair the ends of chromosomes that are lost during normal replication. Without such ongoing maintenance, stem cells would soon cease dividing and embryos would fail to develop."This is the...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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