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Latest Cell division Stories

2008-11-23 15:25:00

 A Florida State University College of Medicine research team led by Yanchang Wang has discovered an important new layer of regulation in the cell division cycle, which could lead to a greater understanding of the way cancer begins.Wang, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the College of Medicine, said the findings will lead to an improved ability to diagnose cancer and could lead to the design of new drugs that kill cancer cells by inhibiting cell reproduction. His paper on...

2008-10-09 15:00:37

ROYAL PALM BEACH, Fla., Oct. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- This may sound like science fiction, but it is truly cutting-edge reality. Internationally acclaimed anti-aging Doctor, Al Sears MD, has become the first U.S. doctor licensed to provide TA-65 to the public through his private practice based in Royal Palm Beach, Florida. This is a revolutionary technology that is based on telomere biology. Telomeres are part of your DNA. They are located at the ends of all the chromosomes and in every cell in...

2008-09-12 03:00:00

By Don Sapatkin PHILADELPHIA - Emmanuel Skordalakes scrutinized the genetic makeup of pigs and cows and rats and hundreds of other creatures before the red flour beetle, an eighth-of-an-inch-long pest found in Southern kitchens, delivered the breakthrough scientists had sought for more than a decade. The result - a key protein molecule modeled in 3-D - could speed the search for drugs against most human cancers. It might even help in the quest for the fountain of youth. "A molecule...

2008-08-20 15:01:11

U.S. scientists have found a new mechanism for cell fate determination -- how one cell can differ from another despite having the same genetic material. Northwestern University researchers say their yeast study demonstrates why mothers and daughters differ in gene expression. By studying yeast, whose entire genome is known, scientists say they can learn the basics of cell division and apply that knowledge to the human system. The researchers said their findings about cell fate...

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2007-12-19 19:12:48

The seemingly inefficient way our bodies replace worn-out cells is a defense against cancer, according to new research. Having the neighboring cell just split into two identical daughter cells would seem to be the simplest way to keep bodies from falling apart. However that would be a recipe for uncontrolled growth, said John W. Pepper of The University of Arizona in Tucson. "If there were only one cell type in the group, it would act like an evolving population of cells. Individual cells...

2005-11-23 13:35:32

Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies discovered that cells co-opted the machinery that usually repairs broken strands of DNA to protect the integrity of chromosomes. This finding solves for the first time an important question that has long puzzled scientists. The natural ends of chromosomes look just like broken strands of DNA that a cell's repair machinery is designed to fix. But mending chromosome ends, or telomeres, would set the stage for the development of cancer in...

2005-08-08 17:42:24

The continual and inevitable shortening of telomeres, the protective "caps" at the end of all 46 human chromosomes, has been linked to aging and physical decline. Once they are gone, so are we. But there are more ways than one to grow old. Researchers at Salk Institute for Biological Studies demonstrate for the first time that the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans succumbs to the trials of old age although its telomeres are still long, and moves with a youthful spring in its crawl despite...

2005-06-10 20:40:00

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Everyone knows that stem cells are controversial. Many people know that stem cells can grow into virtually any cell type found in the body, from a red blood cell to a muscle cell to a brain cell. But no one really knows why stem cells continue to divide and renew themselves long after the point where other cells stop dividing. Now scientists at Northwestern University and the University of Washington offer one of the first clues as to why stem cells ignore stop signs in...


Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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