Quantcast

Latest Cell growth Stories

2010-12-01 22:49:16

University of Michigan researchers have discovered that a protein known to regulate cellular metabolism is also necessary for normal cell division in blood-forming stem cells. Loss of the protein results in an abnormal number of chromosomes and a high rate of cell death. The finding demonstrates that stem cells are metabolically different from other blood-forming cells, which can divide without the protein, Lkb1. This metabolic difference could someday be used to better control the behavior...

2010-09-23 12:55:11

While scientists have spent the past 40 years describing the intricate series of events that occur when one mammalian cell divides into two, they still haven't agreed on how the process begins. There are two seemingly contradictory theories, which now may be reconciled by a third theory being proposed by Duke University bioengineer Lingchong You. These findings could provide insights into the initiation of disease, such as cancer, which is marked by uncontrolled cell proliferation. During...

2010-08-17 17:16:13

A protein that plays a key role in regulating the onset of cell division has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The research, published by Cell Press in the August issue of the journal Cancer Cell, provides evidence that combination therapies targeting different phases of the cell division cycle are highly desirable for optimal cancer treatment. Mitosis is one phase of the cell cycle that divides a single cell into two new but genetically identical...

2010-08-05 16:39:11

Tissue regeneration a la salamanders and newts seems like it should be the stuff of science fiction. But it happens routinely. Why can't we mammals just re-grow a limb or churn out a few new heart muscle cells as needed? New research suggests there might be a very good reason: Restricting our cells' ability to pop in and out of the cell cycle at will "” a prerequisite for the cell division necessary to make new tissue "” reduces the chances that they'll run amok and form...

2010-07-15 02:40:09

Researchers reveal that JNK, a protein long known to help cells respond to stress, also controls cell cycle Put simply, a tumor is the result of out-of-control cell growth. To assure that the cell cycle "“ the cell's process of duplicating itself to make more cells "“ goes smoothly, a large network of proteins tells other proteins what to do and when to do it. When any of these layers of protein regulation fail, cell growth can get out of hand. A new study led by Ze'ev Ronai,...

2010-07-13 09:15:00

HUNTSVILLE, Ala., July 13 /PRNewswire/ -- InQ Biosciences, a provider of innovative technologies for cell growth and research, announced its plans to launch the InQ(TM) Cell Research System during the fourth quarter of 2010. InQ is the first fully integrated system that creates a high fidelity in vivo environment for studying stem cells, plus nerve, brain, and other mammalian cells for disease research. "The InQ system is the only cell research instrument that combines a dynamic...

2010-07-01 15:48:18

It may seem intuitive that growth and development somehow go together so that plants and animals end up with the right number of cells in all the right places. But it is only now that scientists at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy have gotten some of the first insights into how this critical coordination actually works in a plant. The answer is surprisingly simple. A well-known developmental protein called Short-root has been found to directly control the activity, in both...

2010-07-01 15:10:22

How do plants and animals end up with right number of cells in all the right places? For the first time, scientists have gained an insight into how this process is co-ordinated in plants. An international team, including Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Duke University in the USA, have linked the process of cell division with the way cells acquire their different characteristics. A protein called Short-root, already known to play a part in determining what cells will become, was...

2010-06-29 02:37:53

Cancer occurs when human cells move and multiply inappropriately. Within cells, a process called phosphorylation serves as an on/off switch for a number of cellular processes that can be involved in cancer, including metabolism, transcription, configuration, movement, cell death and differentiation. This process is controlled by a group of enzymes called protein kinases that "“ working together and separately "“ modify the structure of proteins, changing them and allowing them to...

2010-06-15 00:49:48

A new study reveals how conflict resolution works on the microscopic scale "“ a protein called Flower marks the weaker cells for elimination in favor of their fitter neighbors. The research, published by Cell Press in the June 15th issue of the journal Developmental Cell, furthers our understanding of a developmental process of "cell competition" and may provide some insight into pathological conditions that involve imbalances in cell fitness, such as cancer. During development, a cell...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
Related