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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 14:04 EDT

Latest Cell membrane Stories

2010-11-26 07:30:00

BUFFALO, N.Y., Nov. 26, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Michael G. Malkowski, Hauptman-Woodward senior research scientist, has received a $6.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health in support of his work to establish the Membrane Protein Structural Biology Consortium (mpsbc.org) as one of nine centers in the United States responsible for determining membrane protein structures within a larger NIH biology-based initiative. Why is this important? The grant entitled Multi-Level...

2010-11-22 19:17:18

A new study reveals that muscle cells fuse together during development by poking "fingers" into each other to help break down the membranes separating them. The study appears online on November 22, 2010 in the Journal of Cell Biology(www.jcb.org). During muscle development, individual muscle cells fuse together to form long myotubes containing multiple cell nuclei. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, fusion occurs between two different types of muscle cell: founder cells and...

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2010-11-22 10:54:32

By Daisy Yuhas, Brookhaven National Laboratory Discovery of mechanism sheds light on how zinc "” essential to the growth of all living organisms "” enters cells A study to be published as the "Paper of the Week" in the Journal of Biological Chemistry this December details how zinc, an element fundamental to cell growth, enters the cell via zinc-specific uptake proteins. The research, conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, is the first to...

2010-11-04 13:32:51

Researchers dispel the notion that membrane infrastructure is all water like... it can have bounce, too Mix two parts cornstarch and one part water. Swirl your fingers in it slowly and the mixture is a smoothly flowing liquid. Punch it quickly with your fist and you meet a rubbery solid -- so solid you can jump up and down on a vat of it. It turns out that cell membranes "“ or, more precisely the two-molecule-thick lipid sheets that form the structural basis of all cellular membranes --...

2010-11-01 15:21:02

They are the portals to the cell, gateways through which critical signals and chemicals are exchanged between living cells and their environments. But these gateways -- proteins that span the cell membrane and connect the world outside the cell to its vital inner workings "“ remain, for the most part, black boxes with little known about their structures and how they work. They are of intense interest to scientists as they are the targets on which many drugs act, but are notoriously...

2010-11-01 15:19:23

Chandra Tucker shines a blue light on yeast and mammalian cells in her Duke University lab and the edges of them start to glow. The effect is the result of a light-activated switch from a plant that has been inserted into the cell. Researchers could use this novel "on-off switch" to control cell growth or death, grow new tissue or deliver doses of medication directly to diseased cells, said Tucker, an assistant research professor in the biology department at Duke. She and colleagues created...

2010-10-19 17:00:25

US, Argentinean scientists: Bacteria respond indirectly to cold Some bacteria react to the cold by subtly changing the chemistry of their outer wall so that it remains pliable as temperatures drop. Scientists identified a key protein in this response mechanism a few years ago, but the question of how bacteria sense cold in the first place remained a mystery. Based on a study by scientists at Rice University and Argentina's National University of Rosario, the answer is: They use a measuring...

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2010-10-12 12:08:47

Using large-scale computer simulations, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have identified the most important factors affecting how molecules move through the crowded environment inside living cells. The findings suggest that perturbations caused by hydrodynamic interactions "“ similar to what happens when the wake from a large boat affects smaller boats on a lake "“ may be the most important factor in this intracellular diffusion. A detailed understanding of the...

2010-10-08 02:22:15

In a technical tour de force, structural biologists funded by the National Institutes of Health have determined the three-dimensional structure of a molecule involved in HIV infection and in many forms of cancer. The high-resolution structure sheds light on how the molecule functions and could point to ways to control its activity, potentially locking out HIV and stalling cancer's spread. The molecule, CXCR4, is part of a large family of proteins called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs)....

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2010-08-25 13:51:46

Pathogens make themselves feel at home in the human body, invading cells and living off the plentiful amenities on offer. However, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, together with colleagues at Harvard University, reveal an opposite strategy used to ensure infection success. Pathogens can actually delay their entry into cells to ensure their survival. Upon cell contact, bacteria trigger a local strengthening of the cellular skeleton with the aid of...