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Latest Cell membrane Stories

2012-08-29 07:01:39

Proteins adorning the surfaces of human cells perform an array of essential functions, including cell signaling, communication and the transport of vital substances into and out of cells. They are critical targets for drug delivery and many proteins are now being identified as disease biomarkers–early warning beacons announcing the pre-symptomatic presence of cancers and other diseases. While study of the binding properties of membrane proteins is essential, detailed analysis of...

2012-08-13 14:53:53

Pathway describes how alpha hydroxyl acids cause skin exfoliation A team of investigators from UC Davis and Peking University have discovered a mechanism that may explain how alpha hydroxyl acids (AHAs) -- the key ingredient in cosmetic chemical peels and wrinkle-reducing creams -- work to enhance skin appearance. An understanding of the underlying process may lead to better cosmetic formulations as well as have medical applications. The findings were published in the Journal of...

2012-08-04 02:07:05

3D movie at ℠ultraresolution´ shows how cell´s machinery bends membrane inwards Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have combined the power of two kinds of microscope to produce a 3-dimensional movie of how cells ℠swallow´ nutrients and other molecules by engulfing them. The study, published today in Cell, is the first to follow changes in the shape of the cell´s membrane and track proteins thought to...

Programmed Cell Death Explained By Lace Plants
2012-07-25 08:21:31

Programmed cell death (PCD) is a highly regulated process that occurs in all animals and plants as part of normal development and in response to the environment. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Plant Biology is the first to document the physiological events in the lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) which occur via PCD to produce the characteristic holes in its leaves. The aquatic lace plant, endemic to Madagascar, uses PCD to generate holes in its...

2012-07-11 14:36:43

Tracked step for step ATP splitting in membrane protein dynamically measured for the first time RUB researchers report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry How a transport protein obtains its driving force from the energy storage molecule ATP, has been tracked dynamically by RUB researchers. Using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, they measured the structural changes in the bacterial membrane protein MsbA and its interaction partner ATP. The researchers led by Prof. Dr. Eckhard...

2012-07-10 14:53:07

Migratory birds and fish use the Earth´s magnetic field to find their way. LMU researchers have now identified cells with internal compass needles for the perception of the field — and can explain why high-tension cables perturb the magnetic orientation. Although many animal species can sense the geomagnetic field and exploit it for spatial orientation, efforts to pinpoint the cells that detect the field and convert the information into nerve impulses have so far failed....

2012-06-12 06:23:43

In a pair of related studies, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified several proteins that help regulate cells´ response to light–and the development of night blindness, a rare disease that abolishes the ability to see in dim light. In the new studies, published recently in the journals Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and The Journal of Cell Biology, Scripps Florida scientists were able to show that a family of...

2012-06-11 21:50:23

Researchers work to untangle knots, slipknots in species separated by a billion years of evolution Strings of all kinds, when jostled, wind up in knots. It turns out that happens even when the strings are long strands of molecules that make up proteins. A new study by scientists at Rice University and elsewhere examines structures of proteins that not only twist and turn themselves into knots, but also form slipknots that, if anybody could actually see them, might look like shoelaces...

2012-06-04 14:05:22

Census reveals unexpected variety of genes involved in cellular transport Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have conducted the first comprehensive census of human cells´ export workers. In a study published online today in Nature Cell Biology, they found an unexpected variety of genes involved in transporting molecules to the cell membrane and beyond. Using a combination of genetics and sophisticated microscopy, Rainer Pepperkok...

2012-06-01 09:27:49

New study creates cells that act like circuits, a step toward developing cellular computers Johns Hopkins scientists have engineered cells that behave like AND and OR Boolean logic gates, producing an output based on one or more unique inputs. This feat, published in the May issue of Nature Chemical Biology, could eventually help researchers create computers that use cells as tiny circuits. Study leader Takanari Inoue, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Cell Biology and...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.