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Latest Cell signaling Stories

2013-07-16 15:42:18

Brandeis scientists bring us a step closer to understanding how to control cancer cells without harming healthy ones The nasty side effects of radiation and chemotherapy are well known: fatigue, hair loss and nausea, to name a few. Cancer treatment can seem as harsh as the disease because it can't differentiate healthy cells from cancerous cells, killing both. But what if there were a way to control or stop the growth of cancer cells without harming other cells? Brandeis biologist...

2013-07-11 15:50:39

Researchers from the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute in Nehru Marg, India have added another piece to the puzzle of how to synthesize an artificial nicotine receptor. Nicotine – the infamous principal component of tobacco – is responsible for smoking addition due to specific receptors in the brain that trigger the dopamine reward system. One of the most long-lasting goals of biomedical science and technology is to design and synthesize...

2013-07-09 21:28:55

Brain cancer is the primary cause of cancer mortality in children. Even in cases when the cancer is cured, young patients suffer from the stress of a treatment that can be harmful to the developing brain. In a search for new target structures that would create more gentle treatments, cancer researchers are systematically analyzing all alterations in the genetic material of these tumors. This is the mission of the PedBrain consortium, which was launched in 2010. Led by Professor Stefan Pfister...

2013-07-09 11:33:27

Knocking down cancer cell survival signals increases the effectiveness of chemotherapy Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly and intractable forms of cancer, with a 5-year survival rate of only 6%. Novel therapies are urgently needed, as conventional and targeted approaches have not been successful and drug resistance is an increasing problem. Previously it had been thought that poor penetration of the drugs into pancreas tumors was the main reason for treatment failure. But now a...

2013-07-02 04:20:02

Singapore, July 2, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Scientists at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) in Berlin (Germany) have discovered a molecular network in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that integrates cell communication signals to keep the cell in its stem cell state. These findings were reported in the June 2013 issue of Molecular Cell.Human embryonic stem cells have the remarkable property that they can form all human...

2013-06-25 13:15:33

Glutamate-like receptor in Arabidopsis does not detect glutamate Plants possess receptors which are similar to the glutamate receptors in the brain of humans and animals. Biochemists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) with colleagues from the University of Würzburg and the Agricultural University of China in Beijing have discovered that these receptors do not, however, recognize the amino acid glutamate, but many other different amino acids. The team reports in the journal "Science...

Cancer Research In Space: Microgravity Could Be The Key
2013-06-25 13:19:29

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online The International Space Station (ISS) has been helping provide cancer biologists a laboratory 220 miles above the surface of the Earth. Although it may seem a little odd, NASA says the orbiting laboratory acts as a great place to study cancer, along with other diseases. Cells in the human body normally grow within support structures made up of proteins and carbohydrates in three-dimensional shape. In a laboratory setting, however,...

Hormone Revolution Two Ancient Mutations
2013-06-25 08:56:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online We tend to think of evolution as a very slow, crawling process. Sometimes, however, as a team of researchers led by the University of Chicago have recently discovered, evolution leaps. The new study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, revealed two key mutations that sparked a hormonal revolution about 500 million years ago. The research team, which included members from the University of Oregon, Emory...

2013-06-24 19:38:34

Nature-published study reveals previously unknown role of septin proteins A major study from researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology provides new revelations about the intricate pathways involved in turning on T cells, the body's most important disease-fighting cells, and was published today in the prestigious scientific journal Nature. The La Jolla Institute team is the first to prove that a certain type of protein, called septins, play a critical role in...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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