Quantcast

Latest Cell Stories

2013-04-12 13:11:17

Protein spheres in the nucleus give wrong signal for cell division A new hypothesis has been developed by researchers in Bochum on how Alzheimer's disease could occur. They analyzed the interaction of the proteins FE65 and BLM that regulate cell division. In the cell culture model, they discovered spherical structures in the nucleus that contained FE65 and BLM. The interaction of the proteins triggered a wrong signal for cell division. This may explain the degeneration and death of nerve...

Role That Flagellum Plays In Helping E. Coli Colonize Rough Surfaces Revealed
2013-04-11 13:06:15

Harvard University New research from Harvard University helps to explain how waterborne bacteria can colonize rough surfaces–even those that have been designed to resist water. A team of materials scientists and microbiologists studied the gut bacterium Escherichia coli, which has many flagella that stick out in all directions. The researchers found that these tails can act as biological grappling hooks, reaching far into nanoscale crevices and latching the bacteria in place....

ALBA Synchrotron Used For First Time As A Microscope To Determine Protein Structure
2013-04-10 09:55:24

Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona The structure of the protein LC8 is linked to cell division and medical applications A team led by David Reverter, a researcher at the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB) of the UAB, has determined for the first time the three-dimensional structure of a protein pair: LC8 and Nek9. Depending on whether or not they bind, Nek9 ensures that the chromosomes group and separate correctly during cell division. By analysing the 3D structure,...

2013-04-08 12:13:20

3-year study offers new evidence about where scientists should be looking A structural biologist at the Florida State University College of Medicine has made discoveries that could lead scientists a step closer to understanding how life first emerged on Earth billions of years ago. Professor Michael Blaber and his team produced data supporting the idea that 10 amino acids believed to exist on Earth around 4 billion years ago were capable of forming foldable proteins in a high-salt...

2013-04-02 12:29:09

NCI and UNIGE researchers warn against a potential backfiring of certain therapies in development Highly expressed in various cancers and known for its cytoprotective properties, TRAP1 protein has been identified as a potential target for antitumor treatments. As a result of the research conducted by Len Neckers, from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, USA, and Didier Picard, from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, this outlook is now being called into question. The...

Roadrunner Supercomputer Decommissioned On Sunday
2013-04-01 04:29:31

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The first supercomputer to complete one quadrillion calculations per second has been officially decommissioned, going offline Sunday after being operational for the past five years. The computer, which was known as Roadrunner, was built by IBM and went online in 2008. The $120 million Roadrunner quickly became the fastest supercomputer on Earth (a title it held until November 2009). Its success was largely due to technology that...

Seabed Microbiology Turned Upside Down By Four Cells
2013-03-28 13:31:10

Aarhus University Single-celled archaea are invisible to the naked eye, and even when using a microscope, great care must be taken to observe them. An international team of researchers led by the Center for Geomicrobiology, Aarhus University, Denmark, has nevertheless succeeded in retrieving four archaeal cells from seabed mud and mapping the genome of each one. "Until now, nobody knew how these widespread mud-dwelling archaea actually live. Mapping the genome from the four archaeal...

2013-03-12 22:45:12

New technique enables more precise design of tissue architecture Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new "plug-and-play" method to assemble complex cell microenvironments that is a scalable, highly precise way to fabricate tissues with any spatial organization or interest–such as those found in the heart or skeleton or vasculature. The study reveals new ways to better mimic the enormous complexity of tissue development, regeneration, and disease, and is published in...

Ultra-HDTV Chip Unveiled At MIT
2013-02-21 08:16:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have unveiled a new high-efficiency video coding (HEVC) chip during this week´s International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco, the MIT News Office reported on Wednesday. Although the chip is not intended for commercial release, its developers believe the challenge of implementing HEVC algorithms in silicon helps illustrate design principles that...


Latest Cell Reference Libraries

Cell (journal)
2012-06-04 14:15:36

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal founded by Benjamin Lewin in January 1974 with the sponsorship of MIT Press. Lewin bought the rights to the journal in 1986 and published it under his own publishing arm Cell Press. Cell Press was sold to Elsevier in 1999, which currently publishes Cell twice monthly. Cell Press publishes several biomedical journals, including Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, Cancer Cell, Current Biology, Structure, Chemistry &...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
Related