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Latest Cell Stories

2013-04-08 12:13:20

3-year study offers new evidence about where scientists should be looking A structural biologist at the Florida State University College of Medicine has made discoveries that could lead scientists a step closer to understanding how life first emerged on Earth billions of years ago. Professor Michael Blaber and his team produced data supporting the idea that 10 amino acids believed to exist on Earth around 4 billion years ago were capable of forming foldable proteins in a high-salt...

2013-04-02 12:29:09

NCI and UNIGE researchers warn against a potential backfiring of certain therapies in development Highly expressed in various cancers and known for its cytoprotective properties, TRAP1 protein has been identified as a potential target for antitumor treatments. As a result of the research conducted by Len Neckers, from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, USA, and Didier Picard, from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, this outlook is now being called into question. The...

Roadrunner Supercomputer Decommissioned On Sunday
2013-04-01 04:29:31

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The first supercomputer to complete one quadrillion calculations per second has been officially decommissioned, going offline Sunday after being operational for the past five years. The computer, which was known as Roadrunner, was built by IBM and went online in 2008. The $120 million Roadrunner quickly became the fastest supercomputer on Earth (a title it held until November 2009). Its success was largely due to technology that...

Seabed Microbiology Turned Upside Down By Four Cells
2013-03-28 13:31:10

Aarhus University Single-celled archaea are invisible to the naked eye, and even when using a microscope, great care must be taken to observe them. An international team of researchers led by the Center for Geomicrobiology, Aarhus University, Denmark, has nevertheless succeeded in retrieving four archaeal cells from seabed mud and mapping the genome of each one. "Until now, nobody knew how these widespread mud-dwelling archaea actually live. Mapping the genome from the four archaeal...

2013-03-12 22:45:12

New technique enables more precise design of tissue architecture Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new "plug-and-play" method to assemble complex cell microenvironments that is a scalable, highly precise way to fabricate tissues with any spatial organization or interest–such as those found in the heart or skeleton or vasculature. The study reveals new ways to better mimic the enormous complexity of tissue development, regeneration, and disease, and is published in...

Ultra-HDTV Chip Unveiled At MIT
2013-02-21 08:16:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have unveiled a new high-efficiency video coding (HEVC) chip during this week´s International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco, the MIT News Office reported on Wednesday. Although the chip is not intended for commercial release, its developers believe the challenge of implementing HEVC algorithms in silicon helps illustrate design principles that...

2013-02-18 13:05:36

The circadian clocks that control and influence dozens of basic biological processes have an unexpected "snooze button" that helps cells adapt to changes in their environment. A study by Vanderbilt University researchers published online Feb. 17 by the journal Nature provides compelling new evidence that at least some species can alter the way that their biological clocks function by using different "synonyms" that exist in the genetic code. "This provides organisms with a novel and...

2013-02-12 20:18:04

New Study Advances Leading-Edge Field of Optogenetics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and UC Berkeley A new study from engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of California, Berkeley, pairs light and genetics to give researchers a powerful new tool for manipulating cells. Results of the study, published in the journal Nature Methods, show how blue light can be used as a switch to prompt targeted proteins to accumulate into large clusters. This process of...

2013-02-07 15:20:05

Scientists hope that one day in the distant future, miniature, medically-savvy computers will roam our bodies, detecting early-stage diseases and treating them on the spot by releasing a suitable drug, without any outside help. To make this vision a reality, computers must be sufficiently small to fit into body cells. Moreover, they must be able to "talk" to various cellular systems. These challenges can be best addressed by creating computers based on biological molecules such as DNA or...

A New Look At How Plants Sense Gravity
2013-02-04 16:31:22

American Journal of Botany Gravity affects the ecology and evolution of every living organism. In plants, the general response to gravity is well known: their roots respond positively, growing down, into the soil, and their stems respond negatively, growing upward, to reach the sunlight. But how do plants sense gravity and how do they direct or signal their cells to grow in response to it? Although botanists understand a great deal about how this works, a recent article in the recent issue...


Latest Cell Reference Libraries

Cell (journal)
2012-06-04 14:15:36

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal founded by Benjamin Lewin in January 1974 with the sponsorship of MIT Press. Lewin bought the rights to the journal in 1986 and published it under his own publishing arm Cell Press. Cell Press was sold to Elsevier in 1999, which currently publishes Cell twice monthly. Cell Press publishes several biomedical journals, including Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, Cancer Cell, Current Biology, Structure, Chemistry &...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'