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Latest Cell Stories

2013-02-18 13:05:36

The circadian clocks that control and influence dozens of basic biological processes have an unexpected "snooze button" that helps cells adapt to changes in their environment. A study by Vanderbilt University researchers published online Feb. 17 by the journal Nature provides compelling new evidence that at least some species can alter the way that their biological clocks function by using different "synonyms" that exist in the genetic code. "This provides organisms with a novel and...

2013-02-12 20:18:04

New Study Advances Leading-Edge Field of Optogenetics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and UC Berkeley A new study from engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of California, Berkeley, pairs light and genetics to give researchers a powerful new tool for manipulating cells. Results of the study, published in the journal Nature Methods, show how blue light can be used as a switch to prompt targeted proteins to accumulate into large clusters. This process of...

2013-02-07 15:20:05

Scientists hope that one day in the distant future, miniature, medically-savvy computers will roam our bodies, detecting early-stage diseases and treating them on the spot by releasing a suitable drug, without any outside help. To make this vision a reality, computers must be sufficiently small to fit into body cells. Moreover, they must be able to "talk" to various cellular systems. These challenges can be best addressed by creating computers based on biological molecules such as DNA or...

A New Look At How Plants Sense Gravity
2013-02-04 16:31:22

American Journal of Botany Gravity affects the ecology and evolution of every living organism. In plants, the general response to gravity is well known: their roots respond positively, growing down, into the soil, and their stems respond negatively, growing upward, to reach the sunlight. But how do plants sense gravity and how do they direct or signal their cells to grow in response to it? Although botanists understand a great deal about how this works, a recent article in the recent issue...

2013-02-01 13:19:16

Scientists report that they have developed a method that cuts down the time it takes to make new 'parts' for microscopic biological factories from 2 days to only 6 hours The scientists, from Imperial College London, say their research brings them another step closer to a new kind of industrial revolution, where parts for these biological factories could be mass-produced. These factories have a wealth of applications including better drug delivery treatments for patients, enhancements in...

Scientists Create Temporary Holes In Cells
2013-01-23 19:20:00

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online [ Watch the Video: Delivering Large Molecules to Cells In Membranes ] Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found a safe way to squeeze large molecules through a narrow construction in cell membranes. The membrane around living cells helps to regulate what gets in and out of the cell. This barrier helps control the cell´s internal environment, but makes it difficult for scientists to...

2013-01-12 05:02:08

Award salutes commitment to turnkey cluster solutions Bothell, WA (PRWEB) January 11, 2013 Silicon Mechanics, Inc., a leading manufacturer of rackmount servers, storage, and high-performance computing hardware, announces that it has been awarded the 2012 Intel Cluster Ready Explorer Award. Presented at the annual Intel® Cluster Ready Partner Appreciation Awards held during Supercomputing 2012, this award recognizes Silicon Mechanics´ commitment to high-quality turnkey cluster...

2012-12-28 15:41:56

One approach to understanding components in living organisms is to attempt to create them artificially, using principles of chemistry, engineering and genetics. A suite of powerful techniques–collectively referred to as synthetic biology–have been used to produce self-replicating molecules, artificial pathways in living systems and organisms bearing synthetic genomes. In a new twist, John Chaput, a researcher at Arizona State University´s Biodesign Institute and colleagues...

Therapeutic Option For Women With Mutant Mitochondrial DNA
2012-12-20 07:08:59

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) have been able to create a new technique that limits inherited disorders in children. The ability of scientists to transfer the nucleus of a cell from one human egg cell to another was considered an important achievement, and results of the study were recently published in the online edition of Nature. In particular,...

Algae Could One Day Help Fight Cancer
2012-12-10 15:08:04

[ Watch the Video: Biology Helping To Engineer Drugs ] Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Pond scum may be undervalued, but a team of scientists recently discovered it could have biological value. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) recently revealed that they have successfully genetically engineered algae that can make a complex, therapeutic drug that is anti-cancer. The researchers believe that the results of the experiment allow...


Latest Cell Reference Libraries

Cell (journal)
2012-06-04 14:15:36

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal founded by Benjamin Lewin in January 1974 with the sponsorship of MIT Press. Lewin bought the rights to the journal in 1986 and published it under his own publishing arm Cell Press. Cell Press was sold to Elsevier in 1999, which currently publishes Cell twice monthly. Cell Press publishes several biomedical journals, including Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, Cancer Cell, Current Biology, Structure, Chemistry &...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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