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Latest Cell Stories

2012-06-04 17:41:18

Pared-down nucleic acid nanoparticle poses less risk of side effects, offers better targeting. Using a technique known as “nucleic acid origami,” chemical engineers have built tiny particles made out of DNA and RNA that can deliver snippets of RNA directly to tumors, turning off genes expressed in cancer cells. To achieve this type of gene shutdown, known as RNA interference, many researchers have tried – with some success – to deliver RNA with particles made...

2012-06-04 14:05:22

Census reveals unexpected variety of genes involved in cellular transport Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have conducted the first comprehensive census of human cells´ export workers. In a study published online today in Nature Cell Biology, they found an unexpected variety of genes involved in transporting molecules to the cell membrane and beyond. Using a combination of genetics and sophisticated microscopy, Rainer Pepperkok...

2012-06-01 09:27:49

New study creates cells that act like circuits, a step toward developing cellular computers Johns Hopkins scientists have engineered cells that behave like AND and OR Boolean logic gates, producing an output based on one or more unique inputs. This feat, published in the May issue of Nature Chemical Biology, could eventually help researchers create computers that use cells as tiny circuits. Study leader Takanari Inoue, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Cell Biology and...

2012-05-28 19:29:08

New York University physicists have developed a method that models biological cell-to-cell adhesion that could also have industrial applications. This system, created in the laboratory of Jasna Brujić, an assistant professor in NYU's Department of Physics and part of its Center for Soft Matter Research, is an oil-in-water solution whose surface properties reproduce those found on biological cells. Specifically, adhesion between compressed oil droplets mimics the mechanical...

2012-05-25 10:07:17

Our cells breathe and digest, as does the organism as a whole. They indeed use oxygen to draw the energy contained in the nutrients they ingest, before discarding the waste, as carbon dioxide and water. Glucose is a preferred nutrient for the cells. Its digestion occurs in the cytoplasm, in the absence of oxygen, and leads to the formation of pyruvate and a small amount of energy. Pyruvate is then carried into mitochondria, the cell's power plants, for a complete burning, thus providing a...

2012-05-25 10:00:28

Amino acid consumption associated with how fast cancer cells divide For almost a century, researchers have known that cancer cells have peculiar appetites, devouring glucose in ways that normal cells do not. But glucose uptake may tell only part of cancer's metabolic story. Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital looked across 60 well-studied cancer cell lines, analyzing which of more than 200 metabolites were consumed or released by the fastest dividing...

2012-05-25 09:44:40

The scientific and technological literature is abuzz with nanotechnology and its manufacturing and medical applications. But it is in an area with a less glitzy aura-plant sciences-where nanotechnology advancements are contributing dramatically to agriculture. Researchers at Iowa State University have now demonstrated the ability to deliver proteins and DNA into plant cells, simultaneously. This is important because it now opens up opportunities for more sophisticated and targeted plant...

Scientists Create Rewritable DNA
2012-05-22 13:29:59

Scientists have found a way to create rewritable digital data storage in DNA through means similar to binary coding. The researchers worked to reapply natural enzymes adapted from bacteria to flip specific genetic sequences of DNA back and forth at will. The scientists, who all work in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University Medical Center, said their method essentially works like that of binary computer coding. "Essentially, if the DNA section points in one...


Latest Cell Reference Libraries

Cell (journal)
2012-06-04 14:15:36

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal founded by Benjamin Lewin in January 1974 with the sponsorship of MIT Press. Lewin bought the rights to the journal in 1986 and published it under his own publishing arm Cell Press. Cell Press was sold to Elsevier in 1999, which currently publishes Cell twice monthly. Cell Press publishes several biomedical journals, including Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, Cancer Cell, Current Biology, Structure, Chemistry &...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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