Quantcast

Latest Cellular differentiation Stories

2013-05-09 11:22:27

A key type of human brain cell developed in the laboratory grows seamlessly when transplanted into the brains of mice, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered, raising hope that these cells might one day be used to treat people with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and possibly even Alzheimer's disease, as well as and complications of spinal cord injury such as chronic pain and spasticity. "We think this one type of cell may be useful in treating several types of neurodevelopmental and...

Mesp1 Gene Triggers Stem Cells To Become Heart, Blood Or Muscle
2013-05-03 18:37:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online When geneticists at the University of Minnesota began work on what they thought was a regulatory gene, they probably had no idea their work would redefine the tiny snippet of genetic material as a key player in stem cell differentiation. According to the team´s report in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the gene Mesp1 is responsible for differentiation of heart, blood and muscle cells from stem cells. “Previous research...

2013-04-23 14:34:19

Researchers at the University of Bonn decode a kind of trigger switch for the conversion of fat cells For a long time, scientists have dreamt of converting undesirable white fat cells into brown fat cells and thus simply have excess pounds melt away. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now gotten a step closer to this goal: They decoded a "toggle switch" in mice which can significantly stimulate fat burning. The results are now being presented in the scientifc journal "Nature...

2013-04-17 15:52:31

Stem cells and tissue-specific cells can be grown in abundance from mature mammalian cells simply by blocking a certain membrane protein, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Their experiments, reported today in Scientific Reports, also show that the process doesn't require other kinds of cells or agents to artificially support cell growth and doesn't activate cancer genes. Scientists hope that lab-grown...

2013-04-17 13:18:38

Understanding the molecular control of placenta formation, the organ which enables fetal growth, is critical in diagnosing and treating related pregnancy complications. A group of scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, and the University of Calgary, Canada has revealed a molecular feedback loop that governs the earliest steps of placenta formation in mice, which is known to mimic placenta formation in humans. Their findings are published April 16 in the open access...

2013-04-12 15:48:09

CWRU research developing technique with promise to guide formation of complex tissues Stem cells can be coaxed to grow into new bone or new cartilage better and faster when given the right molecular cues and room inside a water-loving gel, researchers at Case Western Reserve University show. By creating a three-dimensional checkerboard–one with alternating highly connected and less connected spaces within the hydrogel–the team found adjusting the size of the micropattern...

2013-04-12 13:13:03

When it comes to delivering genes to living human tissue, the odds of success come down the molecule. The entire therapy – including the tools used to bring new genetic material into a cell – must have predictable effects. Now, a new screening process will simplify non-viral transfection, providing a method researchers and clinicians use to find an optimal set of biomaterials to deliver genes to cells. Developed by William Murphy, the Harvey D. Spangler professor of...

2013-04-10 13:24:01

Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, is the primary cause of heart disease. It is caused by calcium accumulation in the blood vessels, which leads to arteries becoming narrow and stiff, obstructing blood flow and leading to heart complications. Although many risk factors for atherosclerosis have been identified, the cause is not known and there is currently no way to reverse it once it sets in. In a new study published 9th April in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers...

Adhesive Force Differences Allows Separation Of Stem Cells To Advance Therapies
2013-04-08 11:28:26

Georgia Institute of Technology A new separation process that depends on an easily-distinguished physical difference in adhesive forces among cells could help expand production of stem cells generated through cell reprogramming. By facilitating new research, the separation process could also lead to improvements in the reprogramming technique itself and help scientists model certain disease processes. The reprogramming technique allows a small percentage of cells — often taken...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
Related