Quantcast

Latest Cellular differentiation Stories

Researchers Discover How Calcium Phosphate Can Make Stem Cells Become Bone-building Cells
2014-01-07 08:10:29

University of California, San Diego With the help of biomimetic matrices, a research team led by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego has discovered exactly how calcium phosphate can coax stem cells to become bone-building cells. This work is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of Jan. 6, 2014. UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering professor Shyni Varghese and colleagues have traced a surprising pathway from these biomaterials...

2013-12-18 15:01:17

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have shown for the first time that the specialized role stem cells go on to perform is controlled by primary cilia –tiny hair-like structures protruding from a cell. Stem cells are capable of becoming any cell type within the body through the process of differentiation. The discovery has the potential for application in the development of new therapies for a range of medical treatments where scientists aim to replace or regenerate tissues...

New Hope For Stem Cells For Application In Regenerative Medicine
2013-12-17 14:15:58

[ Watch The Video: Reprogramming Adult Somatic Cells to Pluripotency ] The Journal of Visualized Experiments Today, December 17, JoVE, the Journal of Visualized Experiments, has published a novel technique that could resolve a snag in stem cell research for application in regenerative medicine—a strategy for reprograming cells in vivo to act like stem cells that forgoes the risk of causing tumors. Dr. Kostas Kostarelos, principal investigator of the Nanomedicine Lab at the...

2013-12-09 23:22:07

Generating new cardiac muscle from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and/or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) could fulfill the demand for therapeutic applications and drug testing. The production of a similar population of these cells remains a major limitation, but in a study just published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, researchers now believe they have found a way to do this. Durham, NC (PRWEB) December 09, 2013 Generating new cardiac muscle from human embryonic stem cells...

Researchers Discover How To Change Cell Types By Flipping A Single Switch
2013-12-04 13:05:09

University of California - Santa Barbara With few exceptions, cells don't change type once they have become specialized — a heart cell, for example, won't suddenly become a brain cell. However, new findings by researchers at UC Santa Barbara have identified a method for changing one cell type into another in a process called forced transdifferentiation. Their work appears today in the journal Development. With C. elegans as the animal model, lead author Misty Riddle, a Ph.D. student...

2013-12-03 13:59:23

The electrophysiological properties of potassium ion channels are regarded as a basic index for determining the functional differentiation of neural stem cells. A recent study published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 28, 2013) showed that the proliferating neural stem cells selected were capable of differentiating into neural cells, and the differentiation process was accompanied by the expression of potassium currents. After 2 weeks of differentiation and development, the...

2013-11-26 16:24:38

The blood stem cells that live in bone marrow are at the top of a complex family tree. Such stem cells split and divide down various pathways that ultimately produce red cells, white cells and platelets. These “daughter” cells must be produced at a rate of about one million per second to constantly replenish the body’s blood supply. Researchers have long wondered what allows these stem cells to persist for decades, when their progeny last for days, weeks or months before they need to...

2013-11-21 13:05:17

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that two separate species of salamander differ in the way their muscles grow back in lost body parts. Their findings on the species-specific solutions, published in the scientific periodical Cell Stem Cell, demonstrate there is more than one mechanism of tissue regeneration. To carry out their study, the scientists labelled different cell types in two species of salamander in order to ascertain what kinds of cell give rise to...

Scientists Generate 'Mini-kidney' Structures From Human Stem Cells For The First Time
2013-11-18 11:37:04

Salk Institute Findings may lead to much-needed therapies for kidney disease Diseases affecting the kidneys represent a major and unsolved health issue worldwide. The kidneys rarely recover function once they are damaged by disease, highlighting the urgent need for better knowledge of kidney development and physiology. Now, a team of researchers led by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has developed a novel platform to study kidney diseases, opening new avenues...

2013-11-04 09:16:31

Kidney repair may not require stem cells Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers have a new model for how the kidney repairs itself, a model that adds to a growing body of evidence that mature cells are far more plastic than had previously been imagined. After injury, mature kidney cells dedifferentiate into more primordial versions of themselves, and then differentiate into the cell types needing replacement in the damaged tissue. This finding conflicts with a previously held...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related