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Latest Cellular processes Stories

2010-08-17 17:42:38

A UCSF-led team has discovered at least one key reason why blood stem cells are susceptible to developing the genetic mutations that can lead to adult leukemia. Their finding also may explain, they say, why some other age-related hematological disorders develop. The study, reported in "Cell Stem Cell" (Aug. 6, 2010) and reviewed in Cell Stem Cell and Cell, opens a new frontier for studying the molecular underpinnings of adult leukemia. The discovery also suggests a possible therapeutic...

2010-08-17 17:16:13

A protein that plays a key role in regulating the onset of cell division has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The research, published by Cell Press in the August issue of the journal Cancer Cell, provides evidence that combination therapies targeting different phases of the cell division cycle are highly desirable for optimal cancer treatment. Mitosis is one phase of the cell cycle that divides a single cell into two new but genetically identical...

2010-08-05 16:39:11

Tissue regeneration a la salamanders and newts seems like it should be the stuff of science fiction. But it happens routinely. Why can't we mammals just re-grow a limb or churn out a few new heart muscle cells as needed? New research suggests there might be a very good reason: Restricting our cells' ability to pop in and out of the cell cycle at will "” a prerequisite for the cell division necessary to make new tissue "” reduces the chances that they'll run amok and form...

2010-07-15 02:40:09

Researchers reveal that JNK, a protein long known to help cells respond to stress, also controls cell cycle Put simply, a tumor is the result of out-of-control cell growth. To assure that the cell cycle "“ the cell's process of duplicating itself to make more cells "“ goes smoothly, a large network of proteins tells other proteins what to do and when to do it. When any of these layers of protein regulation fail, cell growth can get out of hand. A new study led by Ze'ev Ronai,...

2010-07-12 13:50:34

Findings may lead to new drug targets A subtle mutation affecting the epigenome "“ a set of dynamic factors that influence gene activity -- may lead to an inherited form of mental retardation that affects boys, find researchers at Children's Hospital Boston. The disorder, which also involves cleft lip or cleft palate, appears to hinge on an enzyme working in a biological pathway that may offer several potential drug targets. The study, published online July 11 in the journal Nature,...

2010-07-01 15:48:18

It may seem intuitive that growth and development somehow go together so that plants and animals end up with the right number of cells in all the right places. But it is only now that scientists at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy have gotten some of the first insights into how this critical coordination actually works in a plant. The answer is surprisingly simple. A well-known developmental protein called Short-root has been found to directly control the activity, in both...

2010-07-01 15:10:22

How do plants and animals end up with right number of cells in all the right places? For the first time, scientists have gained an insight into how this process is co-ordinated in plants. An international team, including Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Duke University in the USA, have linked the process of cell division with the way cells acquire their different characteristics. A protein called Short-root, already known to play a part in determining what cells will become, was...

2010-06-24 04:12:21

A team of researchers, led by Carlos L³pez-Otín, at Universidad de Oviedo, Spain, has identified in mice an essential role for the cellular process known as autophagy in inner ear development and balance sensing. The team hopes that these data will provide new understanding of human balance disorders, which are of increasing relevance as the elderly population expands, and possibly new therapeutic approaches. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process by which...

2010-06-15 00:49:48

A new study reveals how conflict resolution works on the microscopic scale "“ a protein called Flower marks the weaker cells for elimination in favor of their fitter neighbors. The research, published by Cell Press in the June 15th issue of the journal Developmental Cell, furthers our understanding of a developmental process of "cell competition" and may provide some insight into pathological conditions that involve imbalances in cell fitness, such as cancer. During development, a cell...

2010-06-03 17:20:13

The liver scarring of ÃŽ±1-antitrypsin (AT) deficiency, the most common genetic cause for which children undergo liver transplantation, might be reversed or prevented with a medication that has long been used to treat seizures, according to findings from Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine that will published in Science and are available online today through the Science Express website. Because the anti-seizure drug...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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