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Latest Cellular processes Stories

2009-01-16 13:51:17

When it comes to keeping brains alive, it seems nature has deemed that females are more valuable then males. As reported in this weeks' JBC, researchers found that nutrient deprivation of neurons produced sex-dependent effects. Male neurons more readily withered up and died, while female neurons did their best to conserve energy and stay alive.The idea that the sexes respond differently to nutrient depravation is not new, and revolves around the male preferences to conserve protein and female...

2009-01-12 09:12:36

Researchers have long known that some repetitive DNA sequences can make human chromosomes "fragile," i.e. appearing constricted or even broken during cell divisions. Scientists at Tufts University have found that one such DNA repeat not only stalls the cell's replication process but also thwarts the cell's capacity to repair and restart it. The researchers focused on this CGG repeat because it is associated with hereditary neurological disorders such as fragile X syndrome and FRAXE mental...

2009-01-06 11:56:11

This month's issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc1_09.dtl) features two articles detailing experimental methods for the analysis of molecular processes involved in DNA repair and post-translational modification of proteins.Homologous recombination is an important mechanism for the repair of damaged chromosomes. When this occurs, a Displacement Loop, or "D-loop," is formed as the two strands of the DNA molecule are separated and held apart by a third strand of...

2009-01-06 11:47:52

Scientists at Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham) have demonstrated important new roles for the protein kinase complex Cdc7/Dbf4 or Cdc7/Drf1 (Ddk) in monitoring damage control during DNA replication and reinitiating replication following DNA repair. Since Ddk is often deregulated in human cancers, this new understanding of its role in DNA damage control could help shape new cancer therapies. The research was published in the December 24 issue of Molecular Cell.Accurate DNA...

2009-01-04 12:33:57

Ovarian cancer recurrence tied to gene's role in promoting autophagy A single tumor-suppressing gene is a key to understanding, and perhaps killing, dormant ovarian cancer cells that persist after initial treatment only to reawaken years later, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report in the December Journal of Clinical Investigation. The team found that expression of a gene called ARHI acts as a switch for autophagy, or self-cannibalization, in ovarian...

2008-11-23 15:25:00

 A Florida State University College of Medicine research team led by Yanchang Wang has discovered an important new layer of regulation in the cell division cycle, which could lead to a greater understanding of the way cancer begins.Wang, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the College of Medicine, said the findings will lead to an improved ability to diagnose cancer and could lead to the design of new drugs that kill cancer cells by inhibiting cell reproduction. His paper on...

2008-09-09 03:00:26

RevGenetics announces the release of its latest science-based telomere health supplements, Astral Fruit. To understand what and how Astral Fruit works we can look at a recent study entitled: "Proteins induced by telomere dysfunction and DNA damage represent biomarkers of human aging and disease."(1) This August study is helping define what markers determine human biological age over chronological age. In this study, it was found that part of the answer to biological aging is in the end...

2008-08-20 15:01:11

U.S. scientists have found a new mechanism for cell fate determination -- how one cell can differ from another despite having the same genetic material. Northwestern University researchers say their yeast study demonstrates why mothers and daughters differ in gene expression. By studying yeast, whose entire genome is known, scientists say they can learn the basics of cell division and apply that knowledge to the human system. The researchers said their findings about cell fate...

2008-07-07 09:01:02

U.S. and Israeli medical researchers say they have discovered one of the factors involved in mitosis -- the ability of cells to daily divide and replicate. Since an inability to control mitosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, the discovery by researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel, might help increase the efficiency of cancer drugs that disrupt DNA replication, such as gemcitabine, or drugs that prevent...

2008-06-27 06:02:23

By Dinh, Anh-Tuan Pangarkar, Chinmay; Mitragotri, Samir Unlike macroscopic problems in mass, energy and momentum transfer, which are described by continuum equations, the movements and interactions of the nanoscale entities within a cell constitute a transport phenomenon known as discrete nanoscale transport (DNT). Imagine yourself on an alien spaceship, watching the daily goings- on of a large city through a telescope. You would see (among other things) complex transportation systems...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.