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Latest Cellular processes Stories

2013-03-18 20:57:34

Results showing the same signaling enzymes can trigger two different processes in the cell sound a warning to biomedical researchers Stroke, heart attacks and numerous other common disorders result in a massive destruction of cells and tissues called necrosis. It´s a violent event: As each cell dies, its membrane ruptures, releasing substances that trigger inflammation, which in turn can cause more cellular necrosis. A new Weizmann Institute study may help develop targeted therapies...

2013-01-22 10:40:39

Cancer cells are resourceful survivors with plenty of tricks for staying alive. Researchers have uncovered one of these stratagems, showing how cells lacking the tumor suppressor BRCA1 can resume one form of DNA repair, sparing themselves from stagnation or death. The study appears in the January 21st issue of The Journal of Cell Biology. The BRCA1 protein helps to mend double-strand DNA breaks by promoting homologous recombination. Without it, cells can amass broken, jumbled, and fused...

2012-11-30 14:21:20

Bacteria that cause the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis in humans create their own food supply by hijacking a process in host cells that normally should help kill the pathogenic bugs, scientists have found. This bacterium, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Ap), secretes a protein that can start this process. The protein binds with another protein produced by white blood cells, and that connection creates compartments that siphon host-cell nutrients to feed the bacteria, enabling their growth...

Body's Own Recycling System
2012-10-12 11:19:21

Researchers discover "molecular emergency brake" in charge of regulating self-digestion Times of distress literally eat away at the core of starving cells: They start to digest their own parts and recycle them for metabolic purposes. This process — called autophagy — also plays a role in immune defense. In that context, however, the digestive machinery is switched on for an entirely different purpose: the elimination of pathogens that have invaded the body. Now, Prof. Ingo...

2012-10-04 10:35:06

Milk consumption has been linked to improved health, with decreased risks of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and colon cancer. A group of scientists in Sweden found that lactoferricin4-14 (Lfcin4-14), a milk protein with known health effects, significantly reduces the growth rate of colon cancer cells over time by prolonging the period of the cell cycle before chromosomes are replicated. In a new study, investigators report that treatment with Lfcin4-14 reduced DNA damage in colon cancer cells...

Tissue Regeneration Study Learns From Salamanders
2012-09-26 11:53:50

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the Salk Institute recently studied the regeneration of new limbs in salamanders and believe that the findings could be useful in studies on regenerative medicine for humans. The scientists published two different studies on the Mexican axolotl, a species of aquatic salamander that has lizard-like characteristics. They found that the salamanders needed more than just the activation of genes...

Stem Cell-based Regenerative Medicine Research May Be Helped Further With Discovery Of Reprogramming Signature
2012-09-19 08:55:31

Salk scientists show nine genes at heart of epigenetic changes in induced pluripotent stem cells Salk scientists have identified a unique molecular signature in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), "reprogrammed" cells that show great promise in regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to generate a range of body tissues. In this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Salk scientists and their collaborators at University of California, San Diego, report that...

2012-08-06 10:36:42

Findings answer puzzling question of how cells know when to progress through the cell cycle It's a longstanding question in biology: How do cells know when to progress through the cell cycle? In simple organisms such as yeast, cells divide once they reach a specific size. However, determining if this holds true for mammalian cells has been difficult, in part because there has been no good way to measure mammalian cell growth over time. Now, a team of MIT and Harvard Medical School...

2012-08-04 02:07:05

3D movie at ℠ultraresolution´ shows how cell´s machinery bends membrane inwards Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have combined the power of two kinds of microscope to produce a 3-dimensional movie of how cells ℠swallow´ nutrients and other molecules by engulfing them. The study, published today in Cell, is the first to follow changes in the shape of the cell´s membrane and track proteins thought to...

2012-07-20 01:54:20

Stowers team reconciles puzzling findings relating to centromere structure Scientists at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research have developed an innovative method to count the number of fluorescent molecules in a cluster and then applied the novel approach to settle a debate rampant among cell biologists–namely, how DNA twists into a unique chromosomal structure called the centromere. Knowing this helps explain how cells navigate the hazards of division and avoid the disastrous...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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