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Latest Cellulosic ethanol Stories

Team Reports On First Decade Of US Trials Of Bioenergy Grasses
2013-12-04 19:13:34

University of Illinois The first long-term US field trials of Miscanthus x giganteus, a towering perennial grass used in bioenergy production, reveal that its exceptional yields, though reduced somewhat after five years of growth, are still more than twice those of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), another perennial grass used as a bioenergy feedstock. Miscanthus grown in Illinois also outperforms even the high yields found in earlier studies of the crop in Europe, the researchers found....

2013-10-08 23:27:36

Biomass and Biofuels Industry Leader to Guide Implementation of Company Innovations Vonore, TN (PRWEB) October 08, 2013 Genera Energy Inc., a recognized leader in biomass feedstock supply advancements, has announced the appointment of Keith Brazzell to the position of chief operating officer. Brazzell previously served as Genera’s vice president of operations and technology and brings strong management and operational experience to Genera’s team. In his new role, Brazzell will be...

2013-10-08 11:51:29

Scientists report in Nature Communications that they have engineered yeast to consume acetic acid, a previously unwanted byproduct of the process of converting plant leaves, stems and other tissues into biofuels. The innovation increases ethanol yield from lignocellulosic sources by about 10 percent. Lignocellulose is the fibrous material that makes up the structural tissues of plants. It is one of the most abundant raw materials on the planet and, because it is rich in carbon it is an...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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