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Oldest stone tool ever discovered in Turkey

Oldest stone tool ever discovered in Turkey

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A stone knife discovered in Turkey is the oldest tool of its kind to ever be found there, and it suggests that humans passed from Asia into Europe far earlier than originally believed. In...

Latest Cenozoic Stories

2014-12-16 23:02:42

The Paleolithic diet, or caveman diet, a weight-loss craze in which people emulate the diet of plants and animals eaten by early humans during the Stone Age, gives modern calorie-counters great

mastering fire
2014-12-15 11:26:47

The ability to start and control a fire is probably the most important technological development in human history and a new study has found that our ancestors probably started mastering fire around 350,000 years ago.

shell engraving
2014-12-05 06:27:40

The earliest known art by our species, Homo sapiens, is thought to have been made around 100,000 years ago, but a new study has revealed that our forbearers Homo erectus may have created simpler art forms at least 430,000 years ago.

mastodon megafauna
2014-12-03 05:26:11

There is a disconnect in our current knowledge about the American mastodon (Mammut americanum) between what we know of their preferred habitat and the age estimates of fossils.

neanderthals
2014-11-20 05:43:26

Based on the analysis of the nasal anatomy of Neanderthals and modern humans, a team of New York City researchers has determined that Neanderthals were not a subspecies of modern humans – as has been previously theorized.

anaconda
2014-11-07 09:56:41

Naturalist and wildlife filmmaker, Paul Rosolie, apparently donned a self-designed, snake-proof suit and allowed himself to be consumed by the Amazonian giant serpent.

sloth
2014-09-12 03:00:31

Today’s sloths might be known as slow, small animals, but their ancestors developed large body sizes at an amazing rate, according to an evolutionary reconstruction published September 10 in BMC Evolutionary Biology.

Leaf-mining Insects Completely Disappeared With The Dinosaurs
2014-07-28 03:16:19

After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared.

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere
2014-07-15 12:58:30

Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and gone extinct long before humans reach the continent. But, according to a new study, researchers have uncovered evidence that North America’s earliest humans may have preyed on the ancient mammals.

Better Understanding Arctic Climate Change Based On Shark Teeth
2014-07-10 08:44:06

The current study used shark teeth collected from a new coastal site on Banks Island, which allowed them to gain a more complete understanding of the changes in ocean water salinity across a broader geographic area.


Latest Cenozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

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Word of the Day
edulcoration
  • The act of sweetening by admixture of some saccharine substance.
The word 'edulcoration' comes from a Latin word meaning 'making sweet'.