Quantcast

Latest Cenozoic Stories

Obdurodon tharalkooschild
2013-11-05 03:26:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The discovery of a lone tooth in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of Queensland, Australia, has led to the classification of a new, giant, now-extinct species of platypus known as the Obdurodon tharalkooschild. The new species in the duck-billed, egg-laying mammal’s family is detailed in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, and while the precise age of the fossil has not been yet been determined, it...

Dental Analyses Find No Common Ancestor Of Humans, Neanderthals
2013-10-22 07:33:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The search for a common ancestor that links modern humans to the ancient Neanderthals that roamed Europe thousands of years ago is far from over, according to a new study published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). An international team of experts, including scholars from George Washington University, the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research in Austria,...

Ancient Skull Of Human Ancestor Implies All Homo Species Were One
2013-10-18 06:36:29

[ Watch the Video: Ancient Homo Species Were Merely Variations On A Theme ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An analysis of a 1.8 million-year-old human skull suggests that the earliest members of our Homo genus actually belonged to a single species, a finding that contradics previous beliefs that there were several different human species walking the Earth during that time. The fossil, which was unearthed in Dmanisi, Georgia, is the first complete skull of an...

Evidence Suggests Recycling May Have Started With Early Hominids
2013-10-12 08:28:18

[ Watch the Video: Recycling Was In For Early Man ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Despite the general perception that recycling is a fairly modern phenomenon, there is growing evidence it dates back to the days of the early hominids, researchers said this week during a four-day conference at Tel Aviv University in Israel. “For the first time we are revealing the extent of this phenomenon, both in terms of the amount of recycling that went on and the...

2013-09-25 10:31:24

About 10,000 years ago, the Neolithic age ushered in one of the most dramatic periods of human cultural and technological transition, where independently, different world populations developed the domestication of plants and animals. The hunter-gatherers gave rise to herders and farmers. Changes to a more sedentary lifestyle and larger settlements are widely thought to have contributed to a worldwide human population explosion, from an estimated 4-6 million people to 60-70 million by 4,000...

Red Meat-Eating Neanderthals May Have Also Been Fish Eaters
2013-09-17 14:22:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have theorized that the reason Homo sapiens were able to out-compete Neanderthals was because they embraced a more diverse diet. However, new evidence being presented by a group of European scientists indicates that Neanderthal menus may have been more diverse than previously thought. According to a study published recently in the journal Quaternary International, salmon bones found in a cave in the Caucasus Mountains were...

Researchers Unearth Ape Skull In Yunnan Province, China
2013-09-06 14:10:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers working at Shuitangba, a site in Yunnan Province, China, announced the discovery of a fossilized ape cranium that is highly unique due to the fact that it comes from a juvenile of the species and at a time when apes had become extinct in most of Eurasia. "The fossils recovered from Shuitangba constitute one of the most important collections of late Miocene fossils brought to light in recent decades because they represent a...

Extinct Hobbit Resembled Humans Not Apes
2013-07-24 10:37:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new report in the Journal of Archaeological Science, an ancient humanoid species referred to as the "hobbit" closely resembled humans and not apes as some experts previously thought. Archeologists first excavated remains of this three-foot-tall human-like primate from an Indonesian cave in 2003. Known to researchers by its scientific name Homo floresiensis, the species is believed to have been a contemporary of...

2013-07-12 12:48:32

Simon Fraser University biologists have discovered a new, extinct family of insects that will help scientists better understand how some animals responded to global climate change and the evolution of communities. The Eocene Apex of Panorpoid Family Diversity, a paper by SFU’s Bruce Archibald and Rolf Mathewes, plus David Greenwood from Brandon University, was recently published in the Journal of Paleontology. The researchers named the new family the Eorpidae, after...

Ancient Sabre-Like Toothed Predator Had Weaker Bite Than Domestic Cat
2013-07-02 10:13:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of years ago, a bizarre, pouched super-predator terrorized South America with huge saber-like teeth. New research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), however, shows the Thylacosmilus atrox had a bite weaker than that of a domestic cat. Marsupials in Australia and America are among the closest living relatives of the extinct T. atrox, which had tooth roots extending rearwards almost into its small braincase....


Latest Cenozoic Reference Libraries

Mapinguari
2014-04-22 13:41:18

Mapinguari The mapinguari or mapinguary is an ape-like cryptid said to inhabit the Amazon rainforests of Brazil and Bolivia. It is also known as the Isnashi. Several attempts to find physical evidence that the creature exists have been conducted. Samples have been gathered, but when analyzed it was found to be from known animals and some of the castings of tracks were inconclusive. Native folklore has described the creature as having only one eye, long claws, backward feet, a...

Palaeovespa
2014-04-18 16:08:43

Palaeovespa is a genus of wasps that holds seven species, all of which are extinct. Two of the species were discovered in Baltic amber deposits from Europe dating back to the middle Eocene era, while the other five were found in Florissant Formation amber from the Priabonian stage era in Colorado in the United States. This genus, and four of its species, was first described in 1906 by Dr. Theodore Cockerell in the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cockerell described all but one...

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

More Articles (13 articles) »
Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related